Evolution of white matter lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1: MR findings

R. J. Sevick, A. J. Barkovich, M. S B Edwards, T. Koch, B. Berg, T. Lempert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To characterize further the evolution of white matter lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1, we reviewed 68 MR images in 43 patients (age, 1-31 years), including 25 follow-up studies (mean interval, 27 months). Lesion number, location, morphology, signal characteristics, and contrast enhancement were assessed. Lesion characteristics and changes thereof were correlated with the patients' ages. Thirty-four patients (79%) had white matter lesions. These lesions were hyperintense on T2-weighted images, were isointense on T1-weighted images, and showed no mass effect or contrast enhancement in 31 patients; in three patients, T1-prolongation was observed (one with significant mass effect). None of the lesions evolved into a glioma. The most common locations were the cerebellum (49%), brainstem (22%), and internal capsule (19%). Nineteen patients had white matter lesions and follow-up studies. Lesions decreased in size or number in seven patients (average age, 13 years), showed no change in three (average age, 12 years), increased in size or number in four (average age, 5 years), and showed a mixed pattern (increased/decreased size/number) in four (average age, 7 years). White matter lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1 frequently increase in size or number early in childhood; this did not indicate neoplasia in our study. The lesions tend to resolve with increasing age. Lesion progression in a child more than 10 years old warrants close follow-up to rule out a neoplasm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-175
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume159
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurofibromatosis 1
Internal Capsule
White Matter
Glioma
Cerebellum
Brain Stem
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Sevick, R. J., Barkovich, A. J., Edwards, M. S. B., Koch, T., Berg, B., & Lempert, T. (1992). Evolution of white matter lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1: MR findings. American Journal of Roentgenology, 159(1), 171-175.

Evolution of white matter lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1 : MR findings. / Sevick, R. J.; Barkovich, A. J.; Edwards, M. S B; Koch, T.; Berg, B.; Lempert, T.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 159, No. 1, 1992, p. 171-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sevick, RJ, Barkovich, AJ, Edwards, MSB, Koch, T, Berg, B & Lempert, T 1992, 'Evolution of white matter lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1: MR findings', American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 159, no. 1, pp. 171-175.
Sevick RJ, Barkovich AJ, Edwards MSB, Koch T, Berg B, Lempert T. Evolution of white matter lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1: MR findings. American Journal of Roentgenology. 1992;159(1):171-175.
Sevick, R. J. ; Barkovich, A. J. ; Edwards, M. S B ; Koch, T. ; Berg, B. ; Lempert, T. / Evolution of white matter lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1 : MR findings. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 1992 ; Vol. 159, No. 1. pp. 171-175.
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