Evidence-based approach to the management of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma

Jeffrey F. Moley, Elizabeth Fialkowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare malignancy of the thyroid C cells. It occurs in hereditary (25% of cases) and sporadic (75%) forms. Sporadic MTCs frequently metastasize to cervical lymph nodes. Thorough surgical extirpation of the primary tumor and nodal metastases by compartment-oriented resection has been the mainstay of treatment (level IV evidence). Surgical resection of residual and recurrent disease is effective in reducing calcitonin levels and controlling complications of central neck disease (level IV evidence). Radioactive iodine, external beam radiation therapy, and conventional chemotherapy have not been effective. Newer systemic treatments, with agents that target abnormal RET proteins hold promise and are being tested in clinical trials for patients with metastatic disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)946-956
Number of pages11
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Calcitonin
Iodine
Neoplasms
Thyroid Gland
Neck
Radiotherapy
Lymph Nodes
Clinical Trials
Neoplasm Metastasis
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Medullary Thyroid cancer
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Evidence-based approach to the management of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma. / Moley, Jeffrey F.; Fialkowski, Elizabeth.

In: World Journal of Surgery, Vol. 31, No. 5, 05.2007, p. 946-956.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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