Evaluation of three different decontamination techniques on biofilm formation, and on physical and chemical properties of resin composites

Carolina Bosso André, Andressa dos Santos, Carmem Pfeifer, Marcelo Giannini, Emerson Marcelo Girotto, Jack Ferracane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This study evaluated three different sterilization/disinfection techniques for resin composites on bacterial growth and surface modification after decontamination. Methods: Two resin composites were sterilized/disinfected with three different techniques: UV light, 1% chloramine T, and 70% ethanol. Four different times were used for each technique to determine the shortest time that the solution or UV light was effective. The influence of sterilization/disinfection technique on bacterial growth was evaluated by analyzing the metabolic activity, using the AlamarBlue™ assay, bacterial viability, and SEM images from biofilms of Streptococcus mutans. The surface change, after the process, was analyzed with ATR/FTIR and SEM images. The solutions used for decontamination (1% chloramine-T and 70% ethanol) were analyzed with 1H-NMR to identify any resin compounds leached during the process. Results: One minute of decontamination was efficient for all three methods tested. Chloramine-T increased the surface porosity on resin composites, no changes were observed for UV light and 70% ethanol, however, 1H-NMR identified leached monomers only when 70% ethanol was used. No chemical change of the materials was found under ATR/FTIR analyses after the decontamination process. Chloramine-T, with no previous wash, increased the bacterial viability for both resin composites and increased the bacterial metabolism for the resin composite without fluoride. Conclusion: UV light had no interference on the resin composites properties tested using 1 min of exposure compared to the other decontamination methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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Decontamination
Composite Resins
Biofilms
Chemical properties
Resins
Physical properties
Ultraviolet radiation
Composite materials
Ethanol
Disinfection
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Scanning electron microscopy
Fluorides
Metabolism
Surface treatment
Assays
Porosity
Monomers
chloramine-T

Keywords

  • Biofilm
  • Resin composite
  • Sterilization
  • Surface analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Evaluation of three different decontamination techniques on biofilm formation, and on physical and chemical properties of resin composites",
abstract = "Objectives: This study evaluated three different sterilization/disinfection techniques for resin composites on bacterial growth and surface modification after decontamination. Methods: Two resin composites were sterilized/disinfected with three different techniques: UV light, 1{\%} chloramine T, and 70{\%} ethanol. Four different times were used for each technique to determine the shortest time that the solution or UV light was effective. The influence of sterilization/disinfection technique on bacterial growth was evaluated by analyzing the metabolic activity, using the AlamarBlue™ assay, bacterial viability, and SEM images from biofilms of Streptococcus mutans. The surface change, after the process, was analyzed with ATR/FTIR and SEM images. The solutions used for decontamination (1{\%} chloramine-T and 70{\%} ethanol) were analyzed with 1H-NMR to identify any resin compounds leached during the process. Results: One minute of decontamination was efficient for all three methods tested. Chloramine-T increased the surface porosity on resin composites, no changes were observed for UV light and 70{\%} ethanol, however, 1H-NMR identified leached monomers only when 70{\%} ethanol was used. No chemical change of the materials was found under ATR/FTIR analyses after the decontamination process. Chloramine-T, with no previous wash, increased the bacterial viability for both resin composites and increased the bacterial metabolism for the resin composite without fluoride. Conclusion: UV light had no interference on the resin composites properties tested using 1 min of exposure compared to the other decontamination methods.",
keywords = "Biofilm, Resin composite, Sterilization, Surface analysis",
author = "Andr{\'e}, {Carolina Bosso} and {dos Santos}, Andressa and Carmem Pfeifer and Marcelo Giannini and Girotto, {Emerson Marcelo} and Jack Ferracane",
year = "2017",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Evaluation of three different decontamination techniques on biofilm formation, and on physical and chemical properties of resin composites

AU - André, Carolina Bosso

AU - dos Santos, Andressa

AU - Pfeifer, Carmem

AU - Giannini, Marcelo

AU - Girotto, Emerson Marcelo

AU - Ferracane, Jack

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Objectives: This study evaluated three different sterilization/disinfection techniques for resin composites on bacterial growth and surface modification after decontamination. Methods: Two resin composites were sterilized/disinfected with three different techniques: UV light, 1% chloramine T, and 70% ethanol. Four different times were used for each technique to determine the shortest time that the solution or UV light was effective. The influence of sterilization/disinfection technique on bacterial growth was evaluated by analyzing the metabolic activity, using the AlamarBlue™ assay, bacterial viability, and SEM images from biofilms of Streptococcus mutans. The surface change, after the process, was analyzed with ATR/FTIR and SEM images. The solutions used for decontamination (1% chloramine-T and 70% ethanol) were analyzed with 1H-NMR to identify any resin compounds leached during the process. Results: One minute of decontamination was efficient for all three methods tested. Chloramine-T increased the surface porosity on resin composites, no changes were observed for UV light and 70% ethanol, however, 1H-NMR identified leached monomers only when 70% ethanol was used. No chemical change of the materials was found under ATR/FTIR analyses after the decontamination process. Chloramine-T, with no previous wash, increased the bacterial viability for both resin composites and increased the bacterial metabolism for the resin composite without fluoride. Conclusion: UV light had no interference on the resin composites properties tested using 1 min of exposure compared to the other decontamination methods.

AB - Objectives: This study evaluated three different sterilization/disinfection techniques for resin composites on bacterial growth and surface modification after decontamination. Methods: Two resin composites were sterilized/disinfected with three different techniques: UV light, 1% chloramine T, and 70% ethanol. Four different times were used for each technique to determine the shortest time that the solution or UV light was effective. The influence of sterilization/disinfection technique on bacterial growth was evaluated by analyzing the metabolic activity, using the AlamarBlue™ assay, bacterial viability, and SEM images from biofilms of Streptococcus mutans. The surface change, after the process, was analyzed with ATR/FTIR and SEM images. The solutions used for decontamination (1% chloramine-T and 70% ethanol) were analyzed with 1H-NMR to identify any resin compounds leached during the process. Results: One minute of decontamination was efficient for all three methods tested. Chloramine-T increased the surface porosity on resin composites, no changes were observed for UV light and 70% ethanol, however, 1H-NMR identified leached monomers only when 70% ethanol was used. No chemical change of the materials was found under ATR/FTIR analyses after the decontamination process. Chloramine-T, with no previous wash, increased the bacterial viability for both resin composites and increased the bacterial metabolism for the resin composite without fluoride. Conclusion: UV light had no interference on the resin composites properties tested using 1 min of exposure compared to the other decontamination methods.

KW - Biofilm

KW - Resin composite

KW - Sterilization

KW - Surface analysis

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