Evaluation of a non-name-based HIV reporting system in San Francisco

Sandra Schwarcz, Ling Hsu, Priscilla Lee Chu, Maree Kay Parisi, David Bangsberg, Leo Hurley, Jennifer Pearlman, Kim Marsh, Mitchell Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To develop and evaluate a non-name-based HIV reporting system. Methods: A population-based study of the accuracy of a set of non-name codes and a prospective study of a laboratory-initiated HIV surveillance system conducted at a county hospital (site 1) and a health maintenance organization (site 2). Participants were persons reported with AIDS in San Francisco and patients with a positive test result for HIV antibody, p24 antigen, viral load, or a CD4 count at the study sites. Results: Proper match rate was 95% for records with complete codes and records with at least 50% of the codes. Proper non-match rate was 99% for records with all code elements and 96% for records with at least 50% of the elements. Completeness of reporting was 89% (site 1) and 87% (site 2). Median number of days between test and receipt of test report at the health department was 9 days at site 1 and 7 days at site 2. During 1999, 78% of HIV-infected patients at site 1 and 87% at site 2 had an HIV-specific laboratory test. Conclusions: A non-name-based laboratory reporting system for HIV is feasible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)504-510
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume29
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

San Francisco
HIV
HIV Core Protein p24
County Hospitals
HIV Antibodies
HIV-2
Health Maintenance Organizations
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Viral Load
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Prospective Studies
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Disease reporting
  • HIV
  • Surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Schwarcz, S., Hsu, L., Chu, P. L., Parisi, M. K., Bangsberg, D., Hurley, L., ... Katz, M. (2002). Evaluation of a non-name-based HIV reporting system in San Francisco. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 29(5), 504-510.

Evaluation of a non-name-based HIV reporting system in San Francisco. / Schwarcz, Sandra; Hsu, Ling; Chu, Priscilla Lee; Parisi, Maree Kay; Bangsberg, David; Hurley, Leo; Pearlman, Jennifer; Marsh, Kim; Katz, Mitchell.

In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Vol. 29, No. 5, 2002, p. 504-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwarcz, S, Hsu, L, Chu, PL, Parisi, MK, Bangsberg, D, Hurley, L, Pearlman, J, Marsh, K & Katz, M 2002, 'Evaluation of a non-name-based HIV reporting system in San Francisco', Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 504-510.
Schwarcz, Sandra ; Hsu, Ling ; Chu, Priscilla Lee ; Parisi, Maree Kay ; Bangsberg, David ; Hurley, Leo ; Pearlman, Jennifer ; Marsh, Kim ; Katz, Mitchell. / Evaluation of a non-name-based HIV reporting system in San Francisco. In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 2002 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 504-510.
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