Evaluating the potential public health impact of a Staphylococcus aureus vaccine through use of population-based surveillance for invasive methicillin-resistant S. aureus disease in the United States

Cynthia A. Lucero, Jeffrey Hageman, Elizabeth R. Zell, Sandra Bulens, Joelle Nadle, Susan Petit, Ken Gershman, Susan Ray, Lee H. Harrison, Ruth Lynfield, Ghinwa Dumyati, John M. Townes, William Schaffner, Scott K. Fridkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

We evaluated the potential effects of a hypothetical vaccine in preventing invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) disease in the United States. Using an active, population-based surveillance program, we estimated baseline disease rates in the United States and compared three distinct vaccination strategies which targeted adults ≥65 years of age, persons at risk for recurrent invasive infection, and patients at hospital discharge. The strategies were projected to reduce the burden of invasive MRSA disease by 12.1%, 13.9% and 17.6%, respectively; with the strategy of vaccinating both adults ≥65 years of age and all adults at hospital discharge having the greatest impact per dose. Our data suggest that availability of an effective S. aureus vaccine could result in substantial reductions in invasive MRSA disease incidence. As candidate vaccines are evaluated, these data will be important in determining the optimal vaccination strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5061-5068
Number of pages8
JournalVaccine
Volume27
Issue number37
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 13 2009

Keywords

  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
  • Potential benefits
  • Staphylococcal vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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