Ethnic Variations in the Expression of Depression

Anthony J. Marsella, John (Dave) Kinzie, Paul Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Samples of Americans of Japanese, Chinese, and European ancestry evidencing clinical levels of depression were administered a depression symptom checklist, and the results were submitted to a factor analysis. Groups differed with respect to the functional dimensions expressed by the patterns. In general, existential symptoms dominated the patterns of the Japanese and Caucasians, while somatic symptoms were more characteristic of the Chinese. In addition, the Japanese evidenced an interpersonal symptom pattern, and both oriental groups manifested a cognitive symptom pattern. A theory was proposed which suggested that symptoms are related to extensions of the self-conditioned via socialization experiences. The role of individual differences, stress, and cultural definitions of disorder in determining the expression of depression was also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)435-458
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1973
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Depression
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Socialization
Caucasian
Checklist
Individuality
socialization
Statistical Factor Analysis
factor analysis
Group
experience
Medically Unexplained Symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Ethnic Variations in the Expression of Depression. / Marsella, Anthony J.; Kinzie, John (Dave); Gordon, Paul.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.01.1973, p. 435-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marsella, Anthony J. ; Kinzie, John (Dave) ; Gordon, Paul. / Ethnic Variations in the Expression of Depression. In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 1973 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 435-458.
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