Ethical implications for providers regarding cannabis use in children with autism spectrum disorders

Susanne Duvall, Olivia Lindly, Katharine Zuckerman, Michael E. Msall, Melissa Weddle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for self-injurious behaviors that can be difficult to treat in the context of co-occurring low IQ and adaptive skills. Increased prevalence and decriminalization of cannabis in some states have led to more frequent questions for pediatricians about the use of cannabis for difficult-to-treat developmental and behavioral conditions. What do we know about the possible benefits and risks of cannabis use in children with ASD? How should the clinician respond to a parent who expresses interest in cannabis to manage behavior in a child with ASD? Ethical analysis that includes harm reduction, health concerns, and information sharing will be discussed. We present commentary on the ethical implications of cannabis use in children with ASD and severe self-harm behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20180558
JournalPediatrics
Volume143
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Cannabis
Ethical Analysis
Harm Reduction
Self-Injurious Behavior
Information Dissemination
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Ethical implications for providers regarding cannabis use in children with autism spectrum disorders. / Duvall, Susanne; Lindly, Olivia; Zuckerman, Katharine; Msall, Michael E.; Weddle, Melissa.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 143, No. 2, e20180558, 01.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4557408d4413448498032db684121351,
title = "Ethical implications for providers regarding cannabis use in children with autism spectrum disorders",
abstract = "Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for self-injurious behaviors that can be difficult to treat in the context of co-occurring low IQ and adaptive skills. Increased prevalence and decriminalization of cannabis in some states have led to more frequent questions for pediatricians about the use of cannabis for difficult-to-treat developmental and behavioral conditions. What do we know about the possible benefits and risks of cannabis use in children with ASD? How should the clinician respond to a parent who expresses interest in cannabis to manage behavior in a child with ASD? Ethical analysis that includes harm reduction, health concerns, and information sharing will be discussed. We present commentary on the ethical implications of cannabis use in children with ASD and severe self-harm behaviors.",
author = "Susanne Duvall and Olivia Lindly and Katharine Zuckerman and Msall, {Michael E.} and Melissa Weddle",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2018-0558",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "143",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ethical implications for providers regarding cannabis use in children with autism spectrum disorders

AU - Duvall, Susanne

AU - Lindly, Olivia

AU - Zuckerman, Katharine

AU - Msall, Michael E.

AU - Weddle, Melissa

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for self-injurious behaviors that can be difficult to treat in the context of co-occurring low IQ and adaptive skills. Increased prevalence and decriminalization of cannabis in some states have led to more frequent questions for pediatricians about the use of cannabis for difficult-to-treat developmental and behavioral conditions. What do we know about the possible benefits and risks of cannabis use in children with ASD? How should the clinician respond to a parent who expresses interest in cannabis to manage behavior in a child with ASD? Ethical analysis that includes harm reduction, health concerns, and information sharing will be discussed. We present commentary on the ethical implications of cannabis use in children with ASD and severe self-harm behaviors.

AB - Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for self-injurious behaviors that can be difficult to treat in the context of co-occurring low IQ and adaptive skills. Increased prevalence and decriminalization of cannabis in some states have led to more frequent questions for pediatricians about the use of cannabis for difficult-to-treat developmental and behavioral conditions. What do we know about the possible benefits and risks of cannabis use in children with ASD? How should the clinician respond to a parent who expresses interest in cannabis to manage behavior in a child with ASD? Ethical analysis that includes harm reduction, health concerns, and information sharing will be discussed. We present commentary on the ethical implications of cannabis use in children with ASD and severe self-harm behaviors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061103502&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061103502&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2018-0558

DO - 10.1542/peds.2018-0558

M3 - Article

C2 - 30610100

AN - SCOPUS:85061103502

VL - 143

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 2

M1 - e20180558

ER -