Etanercept prevents airway hyperresponsiveness by protecting neuronal M 2 muscarinic receptors in antigen-challenged guinea pigs

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Abstract

Background and purpose: Increased tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is associated with airway hyperreactivity in antigen-challenged animals. In human asthmatics, TNF-α is increased and blocking it prevents airway hyperreactivity in some asthmatic patients. However, the mechanisms by which TNF-α mediates hyperreactivity are unknown. Airway hyperreactivity can be caused by dysfunction of neuronal M 2 muscarinic receptors that normally limit acetylcholine release from parasympathetic nerves. Here we test whether blocking TNF-α receptors with etanercept prevents M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity in antigen-challenged guinea pigs. Experimental approach: Ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs were challenged by inhalation of antigen. Some animals received etanercept (3 mg kg -1 i.p.) 3 h before challenge. 24 h after challenge, airway hyperreactivity and M 2 receptor function were tested. Inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage, blood and lung were counted. TNF-α and its receptors were detected by real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry in parasympathetic nerves from humans and guinea pigs and in human neuroblastoma cells. Key results: Antigen-challenged animals were hyperreactive to vagal stimulation and neuronal M 2 receptors were dysfunctional. Both M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity were prevented by etanercept. Etanercept reduced eosinophils around airway nerves, and in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage and airway smooth muscle. Also, TNF-α decreased M 2 receptor mRNA in human and guinea pig parasympathetic neurons. Conclusions and implications: Tumour necrosis factor-α may contribute to M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity directly by decreasing receptor expression and indirectly by promoting recruitment of eosinophils, containing major basic protein, an M 2 antagonist. This suggests that etanercept may be beneficial in treatment of allergic asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-210
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Pharmacology
Volume156
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

Fingerprint

Muscarinic Receptors
Guinea Pigs
Antigens
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors
Bronchoalveolar Lavage
Eosinophil Major Basic Protein
Ovalbumin
Neuroblastoma
Eosinophils
Inhalation
Acetylcholine
Smooth Muscle
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Asthma
Immunohistochemistry
Etanercept
Neurons
Lung
Messenger RNA

Keywords

  • Airway hyperreactivity
  • Asthma
  • Eosinophil
  • TNF-α

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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title = "Etanercept prevents airway hyperresponsiveness by protecting neuronal M 2 muscarinic receptors in antigen-challenged guinea pigs",
abstract = "Background and purpose: Increased tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is associated with airway hyperreactivity in antigen-challenged animals. In human asthmatics, TNF-α is increased and blocking it prevents airway hyperreactivity in some asthmatic patients. However, the mechanisms by which TNF-α mediates hyperreactivity are unknown. Airway hyperreactivity can be caused by dysfunction of neuronal M 2 muscarinic receptors that normally limit acetylcholine release from parasympathetic nerves. Here we test whether blocking TNF-α receptors with etanercept prevents M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity in antigen-challenged guinea pigs. Experimental approach: Ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs were challenged by inhalation of antigen. Some animals received etanercept (3 mg kg -1 i.p.) 3 h before challenge. 24 h after challenge, airway hyperreactivity and M 2 receptor function were tested. Inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage, blood and lung were counted. TNF-α and its receptors were detected by real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry in parasympathetic nerves from humans and guinea pigs and in human neuroblastoma cells. Key results: Antigen-challenged animals were hyperreactive to vagal stimulation and neuronal M 2 receptors were dysfunctional. Both M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity were prevented by etanercept. Etanercept reduced eosinophils around airway nerves, and in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage and airway smooth muscle. Also, TNF-α decreased M 2 receptor mRNA in human and guinea pig parasympathetic neurons. Conclusions and implications: Tumour necrosis factor-α may contribute to M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity directly by decreasing receptor expression and indirectly by promoting recruitment of eosinophils, containing major basic protein, an M 2 antagonist. This suggests that etanercept may be beneficial in treatment of allergic asthma.",
keywords = "Airway hyperreactivity, Asthma, Eosinophil, TNF-α",
author = "Nie, {Zhenying (Jane)} and David Jacoby and Allison Fryer",
year = "2009",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Etanercept prevents airway hyperresponsiveness by protecting neuronal M 2 muscarinic receptors in antigen-challenged guinea pigs

AU - Nie, Zhenying (Jane)

AU - Jacoby, David

AU - Fryer, Allison

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N2 - Background and purpose: Increased tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is associated with airway hyperreactivity in antigen-challenged animals. In human asthmatics, TNF-α is increased and blocking it prevents airway hyperreactivity in some asthmatic patients. However, the mechanisms by which TNF-α mediates hyperreactivity are unknown. Airway hyperreactivity can be caused by dysfunction of neuronal M 2 muscarinic receptors that normally limit acetylcholine release from parasympathetic nerves. Here we test whether blocking TNF-α receptors with etanercept prevents M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity in antigen-challenged guinea pigs. Experimental approach: Ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs were challenged by inhalation of antigen. Some animals received etanercept (3 mg kg -1 i.p.) 3 h before challenge. 24 h after challenge, airway hyperreactivity and M 2 receptor function were tested. Inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage, blood and lung were counted. TNF-α and its receptors were detected by real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry in parasympathetic nerves from humans and guinea pigs and in human neuroblastoma cells. Key results: Antigen-challenged animals were hyperreactive to vagal stimulation and neuronal M 2 receptors were dysfunctional. Both M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity were prevented by etanercept. Etanercept reduced eosinophils around airway nerves, and in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage and airway smooth muscle. Also, TNF-α decreased M 2 receptor mRNA in human and guinea pig parasympathetic neurons. Conclusions and implications: Tumour necrosis factor-α may contribute to M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity directly by decreasing receptor expression and indirectly by promoting recruitment of eosinophils, containing major basic protein, an M 2 antagonist. This suggests that etanercept may be beneficial in treatment of allergic asthma.

AB - Background and purpose: Increased tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is associated with airway hyperreactivity in antigen-challenged animals. In human asthmatics, TNF-α is increased and blocking it prevents airway hyperreactivity in some asthmatic patients. However, the mechanisms by which TNF-α mediates hyperreactivity are unknown. Airway hyperreactivity can be caused by dysfunction of neuronal M 2 muscarinic receptors that normally limit acetylcholine release from parasympathetic nerves. Here we test whether blocking TNF-α receptors with etanercept prevents M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity in antigen-challenged guinea pigs. Experimental approach: Ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs were challenged by inhalation of antigen. Some animals received etanercept (3 mg kg -1 i.p.) 3 h before challenge. 24 h after challenge, airway hyperreactivity and M 2 receptor function were tested. Inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage, blood and lung were counted. TNF-α and its receptors were detected by real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry in parasympathetic nerves from humans and guinea pigs and in human neuroblastoma cells. Key results: Antigen-challenged animals were hyperreactive to vagal stimulation and neuronal M 2 receptors were dysfunctional. Both M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity were prevented by etanercept. Etanercept reduced eosinophils around airway nerves, and in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage and airway smooth muscle. Also, TNF-α decreased M 2 receptor mRNA in human and guinea pig parasympathetic neurons. Conclusions and implications: Tumour necrosis factor-α may contribute to M 2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity directly by decreasing receptor expression and indirectly by promoting recruitment of eosinophils, containing major basic protein, an M 2 antagonist. This suggests that etanercept may be beneficial in treatment of allergic asthma.

KW - Airway hyperreactivity

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KW - Eosinophil

KW - TNF-α

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