Estimation of animal intelligence by university students in Japan and the United States

Sadahiko Nakajima, Kohki Arimitsu, Kennon (Matt) Lattal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Japanese and American university students rated the intelligence of 56 animals relative to that of humans. In general, American students (n=104) rated animal intelligence higher than did Japanese students (n=235), and females rated intelligence higher than did males. In spite of these differences among groups, the general patterns of ratings were almost identical: The correlation coefficients of the male-female comparisons were 0.99 in both countries, and the coefficients of Japan-US comparisons in male and female groups were 0.95 and 0.96, respectively The intelligence ratings generally corresponded to the so-called "phylogenetic scale" from amoeba to chimpanzee, with several exceptions. The implications of these findings for the cross-cultural analysis of perceptions of animal mentality are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-205
Number of pages12
JournalAnthrozoos
Volume15
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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college students
Intelligence
intelligence
Japan
student
animal
Students
university
students
animals
rating
Amoeba
Pan troglodytes
cultural analysis
Asian Americans
mentality
phylogenetics
Group
phylogeny
comparison

Keywords

  • Animal intelligence
  • Attitudes
  • Folk psychology
  • Lay theories

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)
  • Anthropology
  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Estimation of animal intelligence by university students in Japan and the United States. / Nakajima, Sadahiko; Arimitsu, Kohki; Lattal, Kennon (Matt).

In: Anthrozoos, Vol. 15, No. 3, 2002, p. 194-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakajima, Sadahiko ; Arimitsu, Kohki ; Lattal, Kennon (Matt). / Estimation of animal intelligence by university students in Japan and the United States. In: Anthrozoos. 2002 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 194-205.
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