Engineering a visual system for seeing through fog

J. Larimer, M. Pavel, A. Ahumada, B. Sweet

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine the requirements for on-board aircraft sensor systems that would allow pilots to "see through" poor weather, especially fog, and land and rollout aircraft under conditions that currently cause flight cancellations and airport closures. Three visual aspects of landing and rollout are distinguished: guidance, hazard detection and hazard recognition. The visual features which support the tasks are discussed. Three broad categories of sensor technology are examined: passive millimeter wave (PMMW), imaging radar, and passive infrared (IR). PMMW and imaging radar exhibit good weather penetration, but poor spatial and temporal resolution. Imaging radar exhibits good weather penetration, but typically relies on a flat-earth assumption which can lead to interpretive errors. PMMW systems have a narrow field of view. IR has poorer weather penetration but good spatial resolution. We recommend using both millimeter-wave and infrared sensor systems, blending the images using multiresolution digital-image pyramid-processing technology, and fusing the resulting real-time images with stored database imagery of the same scene.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSAE Technical Papers
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes
Event22nd International Conference on Environmental Systems - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Jul 13 1992Jul 16 1992

Other

Other22nd International Conference on Environmental Systems
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period7/13/927/16/92

Fingerprint

Fog
Millimeter waves
Radar imaging
Infrared radiation
Hazards
Sensors
Aircraft
Landing
Airports
Image processing
Earth (planet)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Pollution
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Larimer, J., Pavel, M., Ahumada, A., & Sweet, B. (1992). Engineering a visual system for seeing through fog. In SAE Technical Papers https://doi.org/10.4271/921130

Engineering a visual system for seeing through fog. / Larimer, J.; Pavel, M.; Ahumada, A.; Sweet, B.

SAE Technical Papers. 1992.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Larimer, J, Pavel, M, Ahumada, A & Sweet, B 1992, Engineering a visual system for seeing through fog. in SAE Technical Papers. 22nd International Conference on Environmental Systems, Seattle, WA, United States, 7/13/92. https://doi.org/10.4271/921130
Larimer J, Pavel M, Ahumada A, Sweet B. Engineering a visual system for seeing through fog. In SAE Technical Papers. 1992 https://doi.org/10.4271/921130
Larimer, J. ; Pavel, M. ; Ahumada, A. ; Sweet, B. / Engineering a visual system for seeing through fog. SAE Technical Papers. 1992.
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