Endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction

J. A. DiSario, M (Brian) Fennerty, C. C. Tietze, W. R. Hutson, R. W. Burt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the safety and efficacy of endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet strictures. Methods: Review of the cumulative experience from two institutions involving 30 patients who underwent endoscopic balloon dilation for peptic ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction. Follow-up was by standardized interview at a mean of 15 months (range 4-28 months). Results: Symptoms occurred for an average of 6 months before dilation and included weight loss, epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating, and anorexia. Gastric outlet strictures had a median diameter of 6 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Ten (33%) patients had active ulcers. Six- millimeter to 18-mm (median 15-mm) balloons were inflated a median of 2 times (range 1-4 times) for a median of 60 s (range 30-180 s). Fifty-one procedures (1.7/patient) were performed; 20 (67%) patients had one treatment and 10 (33%) had multiple treatments. Twenty-four (80%) patients achieved sustained symptom relief, 17 of 20 having a single procedure and 7 of 10 required multiple sessions. Dilation failed in 4 (13%) patients with long duodenal strictures. Two (6.7%) patients dilated to 18 mm suffered perforation. Both recovered uneventfully after surgery. Conclusions: Endoscopic balloon dilation is safe and effective for most patients with ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)868-871
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume89
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gastric Outlet Obstruction
Ulcer
Dilatation
Pathologic Constriction
Anorexia
Stomach Ulcer
Peptic Ulcer
Nausea
Vomiting
Weight Loss
Stomach
Interviews
Safety
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

DiSario, J. A., Fennerty, M. B., Tietze, C. C., Hutson, W. R., & Burt, R. W. (1994). Endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction. American Journal of Gastroenterology, 89(6), 868-871.

Endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction. / DiSario, J. A.; Fennerty, M (Brian); Tietze, C. C.; Hutson, W. R.; Burt, R. W.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 89, No. 6, 1994, p. 868-871.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DiSario, JA, Fennerty, MB, Tietze, CC, Hutson, WR & Burt, RW 1994, 'Endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction', American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 89, no. 6, pp. 868-871.
DiSario, J. A. ; Fennerty, M (Brian) ; Tietze, C. C. ; Hutson, W. R. ; Burt, R. W. / Endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 1994 ; Vol. 89, No. 6. pp. 868-871.
@article{1d356b71a74342ee90a4734753b1ff06,
title = "Endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the safety and efficacy of endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet strictures. Methods: Review of the cumulative experience from two institutions involving 30 patients who underwent endoscopic balloon dilation for peptic ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction. Follow-up was by standardized interview at a mean of 15 months (range 4-28 months). Results: Symptoms occurred for an average of 6 months before dilation and included weight loss, epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating, and anorexia. Gastric outlet strictures had a median diameter of 6 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Ten (33{\%}) patients had active ulcers. Six- millimeter to 18-mm (median 15-mm) balloons were inflated a median of 2 times (range 1-4 times) for a median of 60 s (range 30-180 s). Fifty-one procedures (1.7/patient) were performed; 20 (67{\%}) patients had one treatment and 10 (33{\%}) had multiple treatments. Twenty-four (80{\%}) patients achieved sustained symptom relief, 17 of 20 having a single procedure and 7 of 10 required multiple sessions. Dilation failed in 4 (13{\%}) patients with long duodenal strictures. Two (6.7{\%}) patients dilated to 18 mm suffered perforation. Both recovered uneventfully after surgery. Conclusions: Endoscopic balloon dilation is safe and effective for most patients with ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction.",
author = "DiSario, {J. A.} and Fennerty, {M (Brian)} and Tietze, {C. C.} and Hutson, {W. R.} and Burt, {R. W.}",
year = "1994",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "89",
pages = "868--871",
journal = "American Journal of Gastroenterology",
issn = "0002-9270",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction

AU - DiSario, J. A.

AU - Fennerty, M (Brian)

AU - Tietze, C. C.

AU - Hutson, W. R.

AU - Burt, R. W.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Objective: To determine the safety and efficacy of endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet strictures. Methods: Review of the cumulative experience from two institutions involving 30 patients who underwent endoscopic balloon dilation for peptic ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction. Follow-up was by standardized interview at a mean of 15 months (range 4-28 months). Results: Symptoms occurred for an average of 6 months before dilation and included weight loss, epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating, and anorexia. Gastric outlet strictures had a median diameter of 6 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Ten (33%) patients had active ulcers. Six- millimeter to 18-mm (median 15-mm) balloons were inflated a median of 2 times (range 1-4 times) for a median of 60 s (range 30-180 s). Fifty-one procedures (1.7/patient) were performed; 20 (67%) patients had one treatment and 10 (33%) had multiple treatments. Twenty-four (80%) patients achieved sustained symptom relief, 17 of 20 having a single procedure and 7 of 10 required multiple sessions. Dilation failed in 4 (13%) patients with long duodenal strictures. Two (6.7%) patients dilated to 18 mm suffered perforation. Both recovered uneventfully after surgery. Conclusions: Endoscopic balloon dilation is safe and effective for most patients with ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction.

AB - Objective: To determine the safety and efficacy of endoscopic balloon dilation for ulcer-induced gastric outlet strictures. Methods: Review of the cumulative experience from two institutions involving 30 patients who underwent endoscopic balloon dilation for peptic ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction. Follow-up was by standardized interview at a mean of 15 months (range 4-28 months). Results: Symptoms occurred for an average of 6 months before dilation and included weight loss, epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating, and anorexia. Gastric outlet strictures had a median diameter of 6 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Ten (33%) patients had active ulcers. Six- millimeter to 18-mm (median 15-mm) balloons were inflated a median of 2 times (range 1-4 times) for a median of 60 s (range 30-180 s). Fifty-one procedures (1.7/patient) were performed; 20 (67%) patients had one treatment and 10 (33%) had multiple treatments. Twenty-four (80%) patients achieved sustained symptom relief, 17 of 20 having a single procedure and 7 of 10 required multiple sessions. Dilation failed in 4 (13%) patients with long duodenal strictures. Two (6.7%) patients dilated to 18 mm suffered perforation. Both recovered uneventfully after surgery. Conclusions: Endoscopic balloon dilation is safe and effective for most patients with ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028200531&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028200531&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8198096

AN - SCOPUS:0028200531

VL - 89

SP - 868

EP - 871

JO - American Journal of Gastroenterology

JF - American Journal of Gastroenterology

SN - 0002-9270

IS - 6

ER -