Endocrinology of growth

Ronald (Ron) Rosenfeld

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growth is a remarkably complex biological phenomenon, requiring the coordinated production of multiple hormones and growth factors. Human growth is characterized by several distinct features, including: (1) rapid growth in late gestation; (2) growth deceleration immediately following birth; (3) a prolonged childhood and a mid-childhood growth spurt; (4) a pubertal growth spurt; (5) relatively late attainment of adult height, and (6) minimal sexual dimorphism of adult stature. Secular changes in the height of humans probably reflect nutritional and environmental factors, rather than major genomic changes. While multiple hormones impact growth, the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis plays a central role in both intrauterine and postnatal growth. GH, after being secreted by the pituitary, binds to a transmembrane receptor and activates a postreceptor signaling cascade, ultimately leading to phos-phorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5b. STAT5b transcriptionally regulates the genes for IGF-I and for key IGF-binding proteins. IGF-I, in turn, binds to the type 1 IGF receptor, resulting in chondrocyte proliferation and statural growth. IGF-deficient states may be divided into secondary forms, reflecting defects in GH production, and primary forms. Molecular defects of the GH-IGF axis have been identified in humans, with phenotypes that correspond to the specific genetic lesions. Therapy with GH or IGF-I can now be matched to specific defects in the GH-IGF axis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program
Pages225-237
Number of pages13
Volume65
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

Publication series

NameNestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program
Volume65
ISSN (Print)16616677
ISSN (Electronic)16623878

Fingerprint

endocrinology
Endocrinology
somatotropin
Growth Hormone
somatomedins
Somatomedins
insulin-like growth factor I
Growth
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
childhood
hormones
insulin-like growth factor binding proteins
human growth
chondrocytes
STAT5 Transcription Factor
Biological Phenomena
lesions (animal)
sexual dimorphism
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins
IGF Type 1 Receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Rosenfeld, R. R. (2010). Endocrinology of growth. In Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program (Vol. 65, pp. 225-237). (Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program; Vol. 65). https://doi.org/10.1159/000281170

Endocrinology of growth. / Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron).

Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program. Vol. 65 2010. p. 225-237 (Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program; Vol. 65).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Rosenfeld, RR 2010, Endocrinology of growth. in Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program. vol. 65, Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program, vol. 65, pp. 225-237. https://doi.org/10.1159/000281170
Rosenfeld RR. Endocrinology of growth. In Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program. Vol. 65. 2010. p. 225-237. (Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program). https://doi.org/10.1159/000281170
Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron). / Endocrinology of growth. Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program. Vol. 65 2010. pp. 225-237 (Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program).
@inproceedings{2ea49d0915624105a0d6c9a431f36a74,
title = "Endocrinology of growth",
abstract = "Growth is a remarkably complex biological phenomenon, requiring the coordinated production of multiple hormones and growth factors. Human growth is characterized by several distinct features, including: (1) rapid growth in late gestation; (2) growth deceleration immediately following birth; (3) a prolonged childhood and a mid-childhood growth spurt; (4) a pubertal growth spurt; (5) relatively late attainment of adult height, and (6) minimal sexual dimorphism of adult stature. Secular changes in the height of humans probably reflect nutritional and environmental factors, rather than major genomic changes. While multiple hormones impact growth, the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis plays a central role in both intrauterine and postnatal growth. GH, after being secreted by the pituitary, binds to a transmembrane receptor and activates a postreceptor signaling cascade, ultimately leading to phos-phorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5b. STAT5b transcriptionally regulates the genes for IGF-I and for key IGF-binding proteins. IGF-I, in turn, binds to the type 1 IGF receptor, resulting in chondrocyte proliferation and statural growth. IGF-deficient states may be divided into secondary forms, reflecting defects in GH production, and primary forms. Molecular defects of the GH-IGF axis have been identified in humans, with phenotypes that correspond to the specific genetic lesions. Therapy with GH or IGF-I can now be matched to specific defects in the GH-IGF axis.",
author = "Rosenfeld, {Ronald (Ron)}",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1159/000281170",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9783805593045",
volume = "65",
series = "Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program",
pages = "225--237",
booktitle = "Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Endocrinology of growth

AU - Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron)

PY - 2010/1

Y1 - 2010/1

N2 - Growth is a remarkably complex biological phenomenon, requiring the coordinated production of multiple hormones and growth factors. Human growth is characterized by several distinct features, including: (1) rapid growth in late gestation; (2) growth deceleration immediately following birth; (3) a prolonged childhood and a mid-childhood growth spurt; (4) a pubertal growth spurt; (5) relatively late attainment of adult height, and (6) minimal sexual dimorphism of adult stature. Secular changes in the height of humans probably reflect nutritional and environmental factors, rather than major genomic changes. While multiple hormones impact growth, the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis plays a central role in both intrauterine and postnatal growth. GH, after being secreted by the pituitary, binds to a transmembrane receptor and activates a postreceptor signaling cascade, ultimately leading to phos-phorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5b. STAT5b transcriptionally regulates the genes for IGF-I and for key IGF-binding proteins. IGF-I, in turn, binds to the type 1 IGF receptor, resulting in chondrocyte proliferation and statural growth. IGF-deficient states may be divided into secondary forms, reflecting defects in GH production, and primary forms. Molecular defects of the GH-IGF axis have been identified in humans, with phenotypes that correspond to the specific genetic lesions. Therapy with GH or IGF-I can now be matched to specific defects in the GH-IGF axis.

AB - Growth is a remarkably complex biological phenomenon, requiring the coordinated production of multiple hormones and growth factors. Human growth is characterized by several distinct features, including: (1) rapid growth in late gestation; (2) growth deceleration immediately following birth; (3) a prolonged childhood and a mid-childhood growth spurt; (4) a pubertal growth spurt; (5) relatively late attainment of adult height, and (6) minimal sexual dimorphism of adult stature. Secular changes in the height of humans probably reflect nutritional and environmental factors, rather than major genomic changes. While multiple hormones impact growth, the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis plays a central role in both intrauterine and postnatal growth. GH, after being secreted by the pituitary, binds to a transmembrane receptor and activates a postreceptor signaling cascade, ultimately leading to phos-phorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5b. STAT5b transcriptionally regulates the genes for IGF-I and for key IGF-binding proteins. IGF-I, in turn, binds to the type 1 IGF receptor, resulting in chondrocyte proliferation and statural growth. IGF-deficient states may be divided into secondary forms, reflecting defects in GH production, and primary forms. Molecular defects of the GH-IGF axis have been identified in humans, with phenotypes that correspond to the specific genetic lesions. Therapy with GH or IGF-I can now be matched to specific defects in the GH-IGF axis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77953107469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77953107469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000281170

DO - 10.1159/000281170

M3 - Conference contribution

C2 - 20139685

AN - SCOPUS:77953107469

SN - 9783805593045

VL - 65

T3 - Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program

SP - 225

EP - 237

BT - Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series: Pediatric Program

ER -