Emergent use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during pediatric cardiac catheterization

Catherine K. Allan, Ravi R. Thiagarajan, Laurie Armsby, Pedro J. Del Nido, Peter C. Laussen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to resuscitate patients following critical cardiac events in the catheterization laboratory. Design: Retrospective review of medical records. Setting: Cardiac intensive care unit and cardiac catheterization laboratory at a tertiary care children's hospital. Patients: Pediatric patients cannulated emergently for ECMO in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (n = 22). Interventions: ECMO was initiated emergently in the cardiac catheterization laboratory for progressive hemodynamic deterioration due to low cardiac output syndrome or catheter-induced complications. Measurements and Main Results: Twenty-two patients were cannulated for ECMO in the catheterization laboratory between 1996 and 2004. Median age was 33 months (range 0-192), median weight 14.8 kg (2.4-75), and median duration of ECMO 84 hrs (2-343). Indications included catheter-induced complication (n = 14), severe low cardiac output syndrome (n = 7), and hypoxemia (n = 1). Three patients (14%) were cannulated in the catheterization laboratory before catheterization for low cardiac output or hypoxemia. During cannulation, 19 patients (86%) were receiving chest compressions; median duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 29 mins (20-57). Eighteen patients (82%) survived to discharge (five of whom underwent cardiac transplantation) and four (18%) died. Of 19 patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation during cannulation, 15 (79%) survived to discharge and nine (47%) sustained neurologic injury. There was no significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors in age, weight, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation or ECMO support, pH, or lactate levels. Conclusions: ECMO is a technically feasible and highly successful tool in the resuscitation of pediatric patients following critical events in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-219
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Cardiac Catheterization
Pediatrics
Catheterization
Low Cardiac Output
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Cardiac Catheters
Nervous System Trauma
Weights and Measures
Tertiary Healthcare
Heart Transplantation
Resuscitation
Medical Records
Intensive Care Units
Survivors
Lactic Acid
Thorax
Catheters
Hemodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Emergent use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during pediatric cardiac catheterization. / Allan, Catherine K.; Thiagarajan, Ravi R.; Armsby, Laurie; Del Nido, Pedro J.; Laussen, Peter C.

In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 7, No. 3, 05.2006, p. 212-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allan, Catherine K. ; Thiagarajan, Ravi R. ; Armsby, Laurie ; Del Nido, Pedro J. ; Laussen, Peter C. / Emergent use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during pediatric cardiac catheterization. In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 212-219.
@article{fd3ec3b1b059463e9d6d5580260df2fe,
title = "Emergent use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during pediatric cardiac catheterization",
abstract = "Objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to resuscitate patients following critical cardiac events in the catheterization laboratory. Design: Retrospective review of medical records. Setting: Cardiac intensive care unit and cardiac catheterization laboratory at a tertiary care children's hospital. Patients: Pediatric patients cannulated emergently for ECMO in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (n = 22). Interventions: ECMO was initiated emergently in the cardiac catheterization laboratory for progressive hemodynamic deterioration due to low cardiac output syndrome or catheter-induced complications. Measurements and Main Results: Twenty-two patients were cannulated for ECMO in the catheterization laboratory between 1996 and 2004. Median age was 33 months (range 0-192), median weight 14.8 kg (2.4-75), and median duration of ECMO 84 hrs (2-343). Indications included catheter-induced complication (n = 14), severe low cardiac output syndrome (n = 7), and hypoxemia (n = 1). Three patients (14{\%}) were cannulated in the catheterization laboratory before catheterization for low cardiac output or hypoxemia. During cannulation, 19 patients (86{\%}) were receiving chest compressions; median duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 29 mins (20-57). Eighteen patients (82{\%}) survived to discharge (five of whom underwent cardiac transplantation) and four (18{\%}) died. Of 19 patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation during cannulation, 15 (79{\%}) survived to discharge and nine (47{\%}) sustained neurologic injury. There was no significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors in age, weight, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation or ECMO support, pH, or lactate levels. Conclusions: ECMO is a technically feasible and highly successful tool in the resuscitation of pediatric patients following critical events in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.",
author = "Allan, {Catherine K.} and Thiagarajan, {Ravi R.} and Laurie Armsby and {Del Nido}, {Pedro J.} and Laussen, {Peter C.}",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1097/01.PCC.0000200964.88206.B0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "212--219",
journal = "Pediatric Critical Care Medicine",
issn = "1529-7535",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emergent use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during pediatric cardiac catheterization

AU - Allan, Catherine K.

AU - Thiagarajan, Ravi R.

AU - Armsby, Laurie

AU - Del Nido, Pedro J.

AU - Laussen, Peter C.

PY - 2006/5

Y1 - 2006/5

N2 - Objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to resuscitate patients following critical cardiac events in the catheterization laboratory. Design: Retrospective review of medical records. Setting: Cardiac intensive care unit and cardiac catheterization laboratory at a tertiary care children's hospital. Patients: Pediatric patients cannulated emergently for ECMO in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (n = 22). Interventions: ECMO was initiated emergently in the cardiac catheterization laboratory for progressive hemodynamic deterioration due to low cardiac output syndrome or catheter-induced complications. Measurements and Main Results: Twenty-two patients were cannulated for ECMO in the catheterization laboratory between 1996 and 2004. Median age was 33 months (range 0-192), median weight 14.8 kg (2.4-75), and median duration of ECMO 84 hrs (2-343). Indications included catheter-induced complication (n = 14), severe low cardiac output syndrome (n = 7), and hypoxemia (n = 1). Three patients (14%) were cannulated in the catheterization laboratory before catheterization for low cardiac output or hypoxemia. During cannulation, 19 patients (86%) were receiving chest compressions; median duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 29 mins (20-57). Eighteen patients (82%) survived to discharge (five of whom underwent cardiac transplantation) and four (18%) died. Of 19 patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation during cannulation, 15 (79%) survived to discharge and nine (47%) sustained neurologic injury. There was no significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors in age, weight, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation or ECMO support, pH, or lactate levels. Conclusions: ECMO is a technically feasible and highly successful tool in the resuscitation of pediatric patients following critical events in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

AB - Objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to resuscitate patients following critical cardiac events in the catheterization laboratory. Design: Retrospective review of medical records. Setting: Cardiac intensive care unit and cardiac catheterization laboratory at a tertiary care children's hospital. Patients: Pediatric patients cannulated emergently for ECMO in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (n = 22). Interventions: ECMO was initiated emergently in the cardiac catheterization laboratory for progressive hemodynamic deterioration due to low cardiac output syndrome or catheter-induced complications. Measurements and Main Results: Twenty-two patients were cannulated for ECMO in the catheterization laboratory between 1996 and 2004. Median age was 33 months (range 0-192), median weight 14.8 kg (2.4-75), and median duration of ECMO 84 hrs (2-343). Indications included catheter-induced complication (n = 14), severe low cardiac output syndrome (n = 7), and hypoxemia (n = 1). Three patients (14%) were cannulated in the catheterization laboratory before catheterization for low cardiac output or hypoxemia. During cannulation, 19 patients (86%) were receiving chest compressions; median duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 29 mins (20-57). Eighteen patients (82%) survived to discharge (five of whom underwent cardiac transplantation) and four (18%) died. Of 19 patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation during cannulation, 15 (79%) survived to discharge and nine (47%) sustained neurologic injury. There was no significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors in age, weight, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation or ECMO support, pH, or lactate levels. Conclusions: ECMO is a technically feasible and highly successful tool in the resuscitation of pediatric patients following critical events in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33646895155&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33646895155&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.PCC.0000200964.88206.B0

DO - 10.1097/01.PCC.0000200964.88206.B0

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 212

EP - 219

JO - Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

JF - Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

SN - 1529-7535

IS - 3

ER -