Embracing vulnerability: Risk and empathy in palliative care

Patricia Boston, Anna Towers, David Barnard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper discusses a case example from a larger case narrative study conducted by the authors during 1995-1999. The case illustrates the premise that the dying experience is ultimately a complex experience and one that the caregiver may never truly understand. Both patient and caregivers remain learners. We propose that while the process of achieving empathic communication necessarily demands "good listening," the palliative care provider may be invited to go beyond the domain of listening, to emotional realms that are neither easy nor comfortable. This paper examines two aspects of empathy: 1) the process of learning to empathize with persons who are dying; 2) empathy as a therapeutic act that requires vulnerability and personal risk within the patient-caregiver relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-253
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Palliative Care
Volume17
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Palliative Care
empathy
Caregivers
caregiver
vulnerability
dying
experience
Communication
Learning
narrative
human being
communication
learning
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Boston, P., Towers, A., & Barnard, D. (2001). Embracing vulnerability: Risk and empathy in palliative care. Journal of Palliative Care, 17(4), 248-253.

Embracing vulnerability : Risk and empathy in palliative care. / Boston, Patricia; Towers, Anna; Barnard, David.

In: Journal of Palliative Care, Vol. 17, No. 4, 12.2001, p. 248-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boston, P, Towers, A & Barnard, D 2001, 'Embracing vulnerability: Risk and empathy in palliative care', Journal of Palliative Care, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 248-253.
Boston P, Towers A, Barnard D. Embracing vulnerability: Risk and empathy in palliative care. Journal of Palliative Care. 2001 Dec;17(4):248-253.
Boston, Patricia ; Towers, Anna ; Barnard, David. / Embracing vulnerability : Risk and empathy in palliative care. In: Journal of Palliative Care. 2001 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 248-253.
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