Electrically evoked reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in mice with alpha tectorin C1509G mutation

Tianying Ren, Wenxuan He

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Mechanical coupling between the tectorial membrane and the hair bundles of outer hair cells is crucial for stimulating mechanoelectrical transduction channels, which convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signal, and for transmitting outer hair cell-generated force back to the basilar membrane to boost hearing sensitivity. It has been demonstrated that the detached tectorial membrane in mice with C1509G alpha tectorin mutation caused hearing loss, but enhanced electrically evoked otoacoustic emissions. To understand how the mutated cochlea emits sounds, the reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations were measured in the electrically stimulated cochlea in this study. The results showed that the electrically evoked basilar membrane vibration decreased dramatically while the reticular lamina vibration and otoacoustic emissions exhibited no significant change in C1509G mutation mice. This result indicates that a functional cochlear amplifier and a normal basilar membrane vibration are not required for the outer hair cell-generated sound to exit the cochlea.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception - Proceedings of the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
Volume1703
ISBN (Electronic)9780735413504
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 31 2015
Event12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception - Cape Sounio, Greece
Duration: Jun 23 2014Jun 29 2014

Other

Other12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception
CountryGreece
CityCape Sounio
Period6/23/146/29/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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    Ren, T., & He, W. (2015). Electrically evoked reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in mice with alpha tectorin C1509G mutation. In Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception - Proceedings of the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing (Vol. 1703). [080004] American Institute of Physics Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4939395