Efficacy of IGF-based growth hormone (GH) dosing in nonGH-deficient (nonGHD) short stature children with low IGF-I is not related to basal IGF-I levels

Pinchas Cohen, Alan D. Rogol, Wayne Weng, Anne Marie Kappelgaard, Ronald (Ron) Rosenfeld, John Germak

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Abstract

Objective Weight-based GH dosing is the standard for treating children with short stature. The current study validates the usefulness of IGF-based GH dosing for GH therapy in nonGH-deficient (nonGHD) children and its relationship with pretreatment serum IGF-I concentration. Design and Patients In this twelve-month, open-label, randomized controlled study, 151 nonGHD (based on GH-stimulation tests), prepubertal children with short stature and IGF-I levels ≤ 33rd percentile [-0·44 standard deviation score (SDS)] were randomly assigned to receive GH (dose based on IGF-I titration algorithm; n = 114) or to observation (n = 37). GH dose (initially 40 μg/kg/d) was adjusted every 3 months to achieve an IGF-I SDS in the upper normal range (66-99th percentile). Measurements and Results In treated children, mean height SDS (HSDS) increased from -2·5 at baseline to -1·7 at 12 months and mean IGF-I SDS increased from -1·7 to 0·1. These parameters remained unchanged in untreated children. There was no relationship between change in HSDS (ΔHSDS) and degree of IGF-I deficiency at baseline. No safety problems were observed. Both groups had a similar advance in bone age. At the end of study, ΔHSDS in treated children showed a positive correlation with IGF-I SDS, but not with GH dose [mean 59 μg/kg/d (range 29-92)], basal IGF-I SDS or 1-month IGF parameters. Conclusions In nonGHD subjects with short stature and serum IGF-I concentrations within and below the lower third of normal, adjusting GH dose to achieve an IGF-I level in the upper normal range resulted in a significant increase in HSDS, regardless of basal IGF-I levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-414
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Endocrinology
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Growth Hormone
Reference Values
Serum
Observation
Safety
Weights and Measures
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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Efficacy of IGF-based growth hormone (GH) dosing in nonGH-deficient (nonGHD) short stature children with low IGF-I is not related to basal IGF-I levels. / Cohen, Pinchas; Rogol, Alan D.; Weng, Wayne; Kappelgaard, Anne Marie; Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron); Germak, John.

In: Clinical Endocrinology, Vol. 78, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 405-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cohen, Pinchas ; Rogol, Alan D. ; Weng, Wayne ; Kappelgaard, Anne Marie ; Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron) ; Germak, John. / Efficacy of IGF-based growth hormone (GH) dosing in nonGH-deficient (nonGHD) short stature children with low IGF-I is not related to basal IGF-I levels. In: Clinical Endocrinology. 2013 ; Vol. 78, No. 3. pp. 405-414.
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abstract = "Objective Weight-based GH dosing is the standard for treating children with short stature. The current study validates the usefulness of IGF-based GH dosing for GH therapy in nonGH-deficient (nonGHD) children and its relationship with pretreatment serum IGF-I concentration. Design and Patients In this twelve-month, open-label, randomized controlled study, 151 nonGHD (based on GH-stimulation tests), prepubertal children with short stature and IGF-I levels ≤ 33rd percentile [-0·44 standard deviation score (SDS)] were randomly assigned to receive GH (dose based on IGF-I titration algorithm; n = 114) or to observation (n = 37). GH dose (initially 40 μg/kg/d) was adjusted every 3 months to achieve an IGF-I SDS in the upper normal range (66-99th percentile). Measurements and Results In treated children, mean height SDS (HSDS) increased from -2·5 at baseline to -1·7 at 12 months and mean IGF-I SDS increased from -1·7 to 0·1. These parameters remained unchanged in untreated children. There was no relationship between change in HSDS (ΔHSDS) and degree of IGF-I deficiency at baseline. No safety problems were observed. Both groups had a similar advance in bone age. At the end of study, ΔHSDS in treated children showed a positive correlation with IGF-I SDS, but not with GH dose [mean 59 μg/kg/d (range 29-92)], basal IGF-I SDS or 1-month IGF parameters. Conclusions In nonGHD subjects with short stature and serum IGF-I concentrations within and below the lower third of normal, adjusting GH dose to achieve an IGF-I level in the upper normal range resulted in a significant increase in HSDS, regardless of basal IGF-I levels.",
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N2 - Objective Weight-based GH dosing is the standard for treating children with short stature. The current study validates the usefulness of IGF-based GH dosing for GH therapy in nonGH-deficient (nonGHD) children and its relationship with pretreatment serum IGF-I concentration. Design and Patients In this twelve-month, open-label, randomized controlled study, 151 nonGHD (based on GH-stimulation tests), prepubertal children with short stature and IGF-I levels ≤ 33rd percentile [-0·44 standard deviation score (SDS)] were randomly assigned to receive GH (dose based on IGF-I titration algorithm; n = 114) or to observation (n = 37). GH dose (initially 40 μg/kg/d) was adjusted every 3 months to achieve an IGF-I SDS in the upper normal range (66-99th percentile). Measurements and Results In treated children, mean height SDS (HSDS) increased from -2·5 at baseline to -1·7 at 12 months and mean IGF-I SDS increased from -1·7 to 0·1. These parameters remained unchanged in untreated children. There was no relationship between change in HSDS (ΔHSDS) and degree of IGF-I deficiency at baseline. No safety problems were observed. Both groups had a similar advance in bone age. At the end of study, ΔHSDS in treated children showed a positive correlation with IGF-I SDS, but not with GH dose [mean 59 μg/kg/d (range 29-92)], basal IGF-I SDS or 1-month IGF parameters. Conclusions In nonGHD subjects with short stature and serum IGF-I concentrations within and below the lower third of normal, adjusting GH dose to achieve an IGF-I level in the upper normal range resulted in a significant increase in HSDS, regardless of basal IGF-I levels.

AB - Objective Weight-based GH dosing is the standard for treating children with short stature. The current study validates the usefulness of IGF-based GH dosing for GH therapy in nonGH-deficient (nonGHD) children and its relationship with pretreatment serum IGF-I concentration. Design and Patients In this twelve-month, open-label, randomized controlled study, 151 nonGHD (based on GH-stimulation tests), prepubertal children with short stature and IGF-I levels ≤ 33rd percentile [-0·44 standard deviation score (SDS)] were randomly assigned to receive GH (dose based on IGF-I titration algorithm; n = 114) or to observation (n = 37). GH dose (initially 40 μg/kg/d) was adjusted every 3 months to achieve an IGF-I SDS in the upper normal range (66-99th percentile). Measurements and Results In treated children, mean height SDS (HSDS) increased from -2·5 at baseline to -1·7 at 12 months and mean IGF-I SDS increased from -1·7 to 0·1. These parameters remained unchanged in untreated children. There was no relationship between change in HSDS (ΔHSDS) and degree of IGF-I deficiency at baseline. No safety problems were observed. Both groups had a similar advance in bone age. At the end of study, ΔHSDS in treated children showed a positive correlation with IGF-I SDS, but not with GH dose [mean 59 μg/kg/d (range 29-92)], basal IGF-I SDS or 1-month IGF parameters. Conclusions In nonGHD subjects with short stature and serum IGF-I concentrations within and below the lower third of normal, adjusting GH dose to achieve an IGF-I level in the upper normal range resulted in a significant increase in HSDS, regardless of basal IGF-I levels.

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