Efficacy of Fresh Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation in the Knee for Adults 40 Years and Older

Devon E. Anderson, Katlyn S. Robinson, Jack Wiedrick, Dennis Crawford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation has become a standard therapy for cartilage restoration in young patients. Purpose: To determine the efficacy of fresh OCA transplantation for focal cartilage lesions in patients aged ≥40 years compared with a group of patients aged ≤39 years. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A database was used to identify patients who underwent fresh OCA transplantation in the knee in a single-surgeon practice over a 10-year period and who completed baseline patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires, including the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC); Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales of Pain, Symptoms, Activities of Daily Living, Quality of Life (QOL), and Sports & Recreation; and Veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey (VR-12). Patients who completed the same PRO measures at a minimum 12-month follow-up were categorized into 2 groups based on age at surgery and were observed longitudinally. Mixed-model regression was used to predict longitudinal growth curves for each PRO score while controlling for confounding patient and surgical variables. Results: The study group consisted of 38 patients with a mean age of 52.32 years (range, 40-69 years) and mean final follow-up of 44.47 ± 24.32 months. The control group consisted of 42 patients with a mean age of 27.19 years (range, 15-39 years) and mean final follow-up of 33.75 ± 19.53 months. A statistically significant improvement from baseline to final follow-up was seen for the IKDC score and all 5 KOOS subscores in both the study and the control groups (P <.01 in 10 of 12 comparisons and P <.05 for the other 2 comparisons). Maximum improvements were seen in the KOOS QOL and Sports & Recreation subscores for both groups. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in the change from baseline to final follow-up or in differences at any time point in model-based longitudinal projections for any PRO score through 5 years. Conclusion: There was a significant improvement of outcomes for both groups, with no statistically significant difference between groups over longitudinal follow-up. The efficacy of fresh OCA transplantation in adults aged ≥40 years with a focal chondral lesion and without osteoarthritis is similar to that of younger adults, and benefits are greatest for the KOOS QOL and Sports & Recreation subscales, which reflect functional outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOrthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume6
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Allografts
Knee
Transplantation
Knee Injuries
Knee Osteoarthritis
Recreation
Cartilage
Sports
Quality of Life
Documentation
Control Groups
Veterans
Activities of Daily Living
Health Surveys
Osteoarthritis
Young Adult
Cohort Studies
Databases
Pain
Patient Reported Outcome Measures

Keywords

  • age
  • articular cartilage
  • knee
  • osteochondral allograft transplantation
  • patient-reported outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Efficacy of Fresh Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation in the Knee for Adults 40 Years and Older. / Anderson, Devon E.; Robinson, Katlyn S.; Wiedrick, Jack; Crawford, Dennis.

In: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 11, 01.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation has become a standard therapy for cartilage restoration in young patients. Purpose: To determine the efficacy of fresh OCA transplantation for focal cartilage lesions in patients aged ≥40 years compared with a group of patients aged ≤39 years. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A database was used to identify patients who underwent fresh OCA transplantation in the knee in a single-surgeon practice over a 10-year period and who completed baseline patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires, including the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC); Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales of Pain, Symptoms, Activities of Daily Living, Quality of Life (QOL), and Sports & Recreation; and Veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey (VR-12). Patients who completed the same PRO measures at a minimum 12-month follow-up were categorized into 2 groups based on age at surgery and were observed longitudinally. Mixed-model regression was used to predict longitudinal growth curves for each PRO score while controlling for confounding patient and surgical variables. Results: The study group consisted of 38 patients with a mean age of 52.32 years (range, 40-69 years) and mean final follow-up of 44.47 ± 24.32 months. The control group consisted of 42 patients with a mean age of 27.19 years (range, 15-39 years) and mean final follow-up of 33.75 ± 19.53 months. A statistically significant improvement from baseline to final follow-up was seen for the IKDC score and all 5 KOOS subscores in both the study and the control groups (P <.01 in 10 of 12 comparisons and P <.05 for the other 2 comparisons). Maximum improvements were seen in the KOOS QOL and Sports & Recreation subscores for both groups. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in the change from baseline to final follow-up or in differences at any time point in model-based longitudinal projections for any PRO score through 5 years. Conclusion: There was a significant improvement of outcomes for both groups, with no statistically significant difference between groups over longitudinal follow-up. The efficacy of fresh OCA transplantation in adults aged ≥40 years with a focal chondral lesion and without osteoarthritis is similar to that of younger adults, and benefits are greatest for the KOOS QOL and Sports & Recreation subscales, which reflect functional outcomes.",
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