Effects on cigarette consumption of a work-family supportive organisational intervention: 6-month results from the work, family and health network study

David Hurtado, Cassandra A. Okechukwu, Orfeu M. Buxton, Leslie Hammer, Ginger C. Hanson, Phyllis Moen, Laura C. Klein, Lisa F. Berkman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Observational studies have linked work- family issues with cigarette consumption. This study examined the 6-month effects on cigarette consumption of a work-family supportive organisational intervention among nursing home workers. Methods Group randomised controlled trial where 30 nursing homes across New England states were randomly assigned to either usual practice or to a 4- month intervention aimed at reducing work-family conflict via increased schedule control and family supportive supervisory behaviours (FSSB). Cigarette consumption was based on self-reported number of cigarettes per week, measured at the individual level. Results A total of 1524 direct-care workers were enrolled in the trial. Cigarette consumption was prevalent in 30% of the sample, consuming an average of 77 cigarettes/week. Smokers at intervention sites reduced cigarette consumption by 7.12 cigarettes, while no reduction was observed among smokers at usual practice sites (b=-7.12, 95% CI -13.83 to -0.40, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 25 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

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