Effects of removing low-frequency electric information on speech perception with bimodal hearing

Jennifer R. Fowler, Jessica L. Eggleston, Kelly M. Reavis, Garnett P. McMillan, Lina Reiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The objective was to determine whether speech perception could be improved for bimodal listeners (those using a cochlear implant [CI] in one ear and hearing aid in the contralateral ear) by removing low-frequency information provided by the CI, thereby reducing acoustic-electric overlap. Method: Subjects were adult CI subjects with at least 1 year of CI experience. Nine subjects were evaluated in the CI-only condition (control condition), and 26 subjects were evaluated in the bimodal condition. CIs were programmed with 4 experimental programs in which the low cutoff frequency (LCF) was progressively raised. Speech perception was evaluated using Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant words in o quiet, AzBio sentences in background babble, and spondee words in background babble. Results: The CI-only group showed decreased speech perception in both quiet and noise as the LCF was raised. Bimodal subjects with better hearing in the hearing aid ear (<60 dB HL at 250 and 500 Hz) performed best for words in quiet as the LCF was raised. In contrast, bimodal subjects with worse hearing (> 60 dB HL at 250 and 500 Hz) performed similarly to the CI-only group. Conclusions: These findings suggest that reducing lowfrequency overlap of the CI and contralateral hearing aid may improve performance in quiet for some bimodal listeners with better hearing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-109
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of removing low-frequency electric information on speech perception with bimodal hearing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this