Effects of neonatal methamphetamine and thioperamide exposure on spatial memory retention and circadian activity later in life

Emily Eastwood, Charles Allen, Jacob Raber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methamphetamine (MA) use increases the likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior and most MA-using women are of child-bearing age. Therefore, cognitive effects following MA exposure to the developing brain are concerning. Exposure of mice to MA during hippocampal development causes cognitive impairments in adulthood. These effects are more severe in female than male mice and mimicked by the H 3 receptor antagonist thioperamide (THIO). In this study, we assessed whether neonatal exposure to MA or THIO also affects cognition in adolescence. As these effects might be associated with alterations in circadian activity, we also assessed circadian activity in a subgroup of neonatally exposed mice. Sex-dependent treatment effects were seen in the water maze. While THIO-, but not MA-treated female mice showed hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention in the first probe trial, MA-, but not THIO-treated female mice showed spatial memory retention in the probe trial following reversal training. In contrast, MA- and THIO-treated male mice showed spatial memory retention in both probe trials. When sensorimotor gating was assessed, MA-treated male mice showed greater pre-pulse inhibition than MA-treated female mice. Regardless of sex, THIO-treated mice gained on average more weight each day and showed an enhanced startle response. In addition, MA increased the length of the circadian period, with an intermediate effect following THIO treatment were observed. No treatment effects in exploratory behavior, measures of anxiety, or contextual or cued fear conditioning. Thus, the water maze is particularly sensitive to detect sex-dependent effects of neonatal MA and THIO exposure on spatial memory retention in adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-236
Number of pages8
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume230
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 2012

Fingerprint

thioperamide
Methamphetamine
Spatial Memory
Retention (Psychology)
Startle Reflex

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Circadian
  • Cognition
  • Hippocampus
  • Methamphetamine
  • Postnatal
  • Thioperamide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

@article{eaafb1981a894fb391db4cffe6efe2e6,
title = "Effects of neonatal methamphetamine and thioperamide exposure on spatial memory retention and circadian activity later in life",
abstract = "Methamphetamine (MA) use increases the likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior and most MA-using women are of child-bearing age. Therefore, cognitive effects following MA exposure to the developing brain are concerning. Exposure of mice to MA during hippocampal development causes cognitive impairments in adulthood. These effects are more severe in female than male mice and mimicked by the H 3 receptor antagonist thioperamide (THIO). In this study, we assessed whether neonatal exposure to MA or THIO also affects cognition in adolescence. As these effects might be associated with alterations in circadian activity, we also assessed circadian activity in a subgroup of neonatally exposed mice. Sex-dependent treatment effects were seen in the water maze. While THIO-, but not MA-treated female mice showed hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention in the first probe trial, MA-, but not THIO-treated female mice showed spatial memory retention in the probe trial following reversal training. In contrast, MA- and THIO-treated male mice showed spatial memory retention in both probe trials. When sensorimotor gating was assessed, MA-treated male mice showed greater pre-pulse inhibition than MA-treated female mice. Regardless of sex, THIO-treated mice gained on average more weight each day and showed an enhanced startle response. In addition, MA increased the length of the circadian period, with an intermediate effect following THIO treatment were observed. No treatment effects in exploratory behavior, measures of anxiety, or contextual or cued fear conditioning. Thus, the water maze is particularly sensitive to detect sex-dependent effects of neonatal MA and THIO exposure on spatial memory retention in adolescence.",
keywords = "Adolescence, Circadian, Cognition, Hippocampus, Methamphetamine, Postnatal, Thioperamide",
author = "Emily Eastwood and Charles Allen and Jacob Raber",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbr.2012.02.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "230",
pages = "229--236",
journal = "Behavioural Brain Research",
issn = "0166-4328",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of neonatal methamphetamine and thioperamide exposure on spatial memory retention and circadian activity later in life

AU - Eastwood, Emily

AU - Allen, Charles

AU - Raber, Jacob

PY - 2012/4/21

Y1 - 2012/4/21

N2 - Methamphetamine (MA) use increases the likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior and most MA-using women are of child-bearing age. Therefore, cognitive effects following MA exposure to the developing brain are concerning. Exposure of mice to MA during hippocampal development causes cognitive impairments in adulthood. These effects are more severe in female than male mice and mimicked by the H 3 receptor antagonist thioperamide (THIO). In this study, we assessed whether neonatal exposure to MA or THIO also affects cognition in adolescence. As these effects might be associated with alterations in circadian activity, we also assessed circadian activity in a subgroup of neonatally exposed mice. Sex-dependent treatment effects were seen in the water maze. While THIO-, but not MA-treated female mice showed hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention in the first probe trial, MA-, but not THIO-treated female mice showed spatial memory retention in the probe trial following reversal training. In contrast, MA- and THIO-treated male mice showed spatial memory retention in both probe trials. When sensorimotor gating was assessed, MA-treated male mice showed greater pre-pulse inhibition than MA-treated female mice. Regardless of sex, THIO-treated mice gained on average more weight each day and showed an enhanced startle response. In addition, MA increased the length of the circadian period, with an intermediate effect following THIO treatment were observed. No treatment effects in exploratory behavior, measures of anxiety, or contextual or cued fear conditioning. Thus, the water maze is particularly sensitive to detect sex-dependent effects of neonatal MA and THIO exposure on spatial memory retention in adolescence.

AB - Methamphetamine (MA) use increases the likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior and most MA-using women are of child-bearing age. Therefore, cognitive effects following MA exposure to the developing brain are concerning. Exposure of mice to MA during hippocampal development causes cognitive impairments in adulthood. These effects are more severe in female than male mice and mimicked by the H 3 receptor antagonist thioperamide (THIO). In this study, we assessed whether neonatal exposure to MA or THIO also affects cognition in adolescence. As these effects might be associated with alterations in circadian activity, we also assessed circadian activity in a subgroup of neonatally exposed mice. Sex-dependent treatment effects were seen in the water maze. While THIO-, but not MA-treated female mice showed hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention in the first probe trial, MA-, but not THIO-treated female mice showed spatial memory retention in the probe trial following reversal training. In contrast, MA- and THIO-treated male mice showed spatial memory retention in both probe trials. When sensorimotor gating was assessed, MA-treated male mice showed greater pre-pulse inhibition than MA-treated female mice. Regardless of sex, THIO-treated mice gained on average more weight each day and showed an enhanced startle response. In addition, MA increased the length of the circadian period, with an intermediate effect following THIO treatment were observed. No treatment effects in exploratory behavior, measures of anxiety, or contextual or cued fear conditioning. Thus, the water maze is particularly sensitive to detect sex-dependent effects of neonatal MA and THIO exposure on spatial memory retention in adolescence.

KW - Adolescence

KW - Circadian

KW - Cognition

KW - Hippocampus

KW - Methamphetamine

KW - Postnatal

KW - Thioperamide

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84857683080&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84857683080&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbr.2012.02.003

DO - 10.1016/j.bbr.2012.02.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 22330947

AN - SCOPUS:84857683080

VL - 230

SP - 229

EP - 236

JO - Behavioural Brain Research

JF - Behavioural Brain Research

SN - 0166-4328

IS - 1

ER -