Effects of long-term progesterone on developmental and functional aspects of porcine uterine epithelia and vasculature: Progesterone alone does not support development of uterine glands comparable to that of pregnancy

Daniel W. Bailey, Kathrin A. Dunlap, James W. Frank, David Erikson, Bryan G. White, Fuller W. Bazer, Robert C. Burghardt, Greg A. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In pigs, endometrial functions are regulated primarily by progesterone and placental factors including estrogen. Progesterone levels are high throughout pregnancy to stimulate and maintain secretion of histotroph from uterine epithelia necessary for growth, implantation, placentation, and development of the conceptus (embryo and its extra-embryonic membranes). This study determined effects of longterm progesterone on development and histoarchitecture of endometrial luminal epithelium (LE), glandular epithelium (GE), and vasculature in pigs. Pigs were ovariectomized during diestrus (day 12), and then received daily injections of either corn oil or progesterone for 28 days. Prolonged progesterone treatment resulted in increased weight and length of the uterine horns, and thickness of the endometrium and myometrium. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of GE were not evident, but LE cell height increased, suggesting elevated secretory activity. Although GE development was deficient, progesterone supported increased endometrial angiogenesis comparable to that of pregnancy. Progesterone also supported alterations to the apical and basolateral domains of LE and GE. Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin binding and αv integrin were downregulated at the apical surfaces of LE and GE. Claudin-4, α2β1 integrin, and vimentin were increased at basolateral surfaces, whereas occludins-1 and -2, claudin-3, and E-cadherin were unaffected by progesterone treatment indicating structurally competent trans-epithelial adhesion and tight junctional complexes. Collectively, the results suggest that progesterone affects LE, GE, and vascular development and histoarchitecture, but in the absence of ovarian or placental factors, it does not support development of GE comparable to pregnancy. Furthermore, LE and vascular development are highly responsive to the effects of progesterone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-594
Number of pages12
JournalReproduction
Volume140
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Progesterone
Swine
Epithelium
Pregnancy
Integrins
Blood Vessels
Claudin-3
Claudin-4
Occludin
Diestrus
Extraembryonic Membranes
Placentation
Corn Oil
Myometrium
Vimentin
Cadherins
Endometrium
Hypertrophy
Embryonic Development
Hyperplasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Embryology
  • Endocrinology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Effects of long-term progesterone on developmental and functional aspects of porcine uterine epithelia and vasculature : Progesterone alone does not support development of uterine glands comparable to that of pregnancy. / Bailey, Daniel W.; Dunlap, Kathrin A.; Frank, James W.; Erikson, David; White, Bryan G.; Bazer, Fuller W.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Johnson, Greg A.

In: Reproduction, Vol. 140, No. 4, 10.2010, p. 583-594.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bailey, Daniel W. ; Dunlap, Kathrin A. ; Frank, James W. ; Erikson, David ; White, Bryan G. ; Bazer, Fuller W. ; Burghardt, Robert C. ; Johnson, Greg A. / Effects of long-term progesterone on developmental and functional aspects of porcine uterine epithelia and vasculature : Progesterone alone does not support development of uterine glands comparable to that of pregnancy. In: Reproduction. 2010 ; Vol. 140, No. 4. pp. 583-594.
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