Effects of kainic acid lesions in lateral geniculate nucleus: activity dependence of retrograde axonal transport of fluorescent dyes

William Woodward, Bruce M. Coull

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kainic acid lesions in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of rats block the retrograde axonal transport of fluorescent dyes in corticogeniculate neurons without affecting the retrograde transport of D-aspartate or the orthograde transport of radiolabelled proteins in these neurons. This blocking of dye transport does not appear to be a consequences of kainic acid-induced damage to axon terminals in the geniculate since retinal ganglion cells are still able to transport dyes retrograde. A more likely explanation for these results is that fluorescent dye transport requires electrical activity in neurons, and elimination of the geniculate afferents to visual cortex reduces impulse traffic in cortical output fibers to a level below that required to support detectable dye transport. This interpretation is supported by the observation that kainic acid lesions also reduce retrograde transport of dyes in cortical neurons which project to the superior colliculus. Electrical stimulation in the subcortical white matter restores the transport of dye compounds in corticogeniculate neurons: evidence consistent with an activity-dependent mechanism of retrograde transport for these substances. These results provide evidence that axon terminals of retinal ganglion cells and corticogeniculate neurons survive in kainate-lesioned geniculates and are capable of normal neuronal function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-115
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Research
Volume454
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 28 1988

Fingerprint

Geniculate Bodies
Axonal Transport
Kainic Acid
Fluorescent Dyes
Coloring Agents
Neurons
Retinal Ganglion Cells
Presynaptic Terminals
D-Aspartic Acid
Superior Colliculi
Visual Cortex
Electric Stimulation
Carrier Proteins

Keywords

  • Dorsal lateral geniculate
  • Fluorescent dye
  • Kainic acid
  • Rat
  • Retina
  • Retrograde axonal transport
  • Visual cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Effects of kainic acid lesions in lateral geniculate nucleus : activity dependence of retrograde axonal transport of fluorescent dyes. / Woodward, William; Coull, Bruce M.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 454, No. 1-2, 28.06.1988, p. 106-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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