Effects of dietary protein deficiency on mineral metabolism and bone mineral density

Eric Orwoll, Marsha Ware, Lenka Stribrska, Daniel Bikle, Tom Sanchez, Mark Andon, Hongfei Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of dietary protein restriction on mineral and bone metabolism are uncharacterized. We studied growing rats fed a diet low in protein (5%) for 4, 6, and 8 wks (n = 10 animals/group) and compared them with animals pair-fed with a protein-replete (18%) diet. The low-protein diet rapidly induced a profound hypocalciuria that persisted for ≥ 8 wk. Serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations were not affected but serum total and free 25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations as well as gastrointestinal calcium absorption were lower in the low-protein animals. Skeletal dimensions were reduced in the protein-deprived rats but there were no significant differences in bone mineral content between control and low-protein animals at 4, 6, and 8 wks. Hence, dietary protein deprivation resulted in slower growth but bone mineral density was maintained when there was a marked reduction in urinary calcium excretion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-319
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume56
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

mineral metabolism
Protein Deficiency
protein deficiencies
Dietary Proteins
bone density
Bone Density
dietary protein
Minerals
low protein diet
animal proteins
calcium
Protein-Restricted Diet
Calcium
bone metabolism
rats
Proteins
Dihydroxycholecalciferols
mineral content
animals
proteins

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Calciuria
  • Protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Orwoll, E., Ware, M., Stribrska, L., Bikle, D., Sanchez, T., Andon, M., & Li, H. (1992). Effects of dietary protein deficiency on mineral metabolism and bone mineral density. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 56(2), 314-319.

Effects of dietary protein deficiency on mineral metabolism and bone mineral density. / Orwoll, Eric; Ware, Marsha; Stribrska, Lenka; Bikle, Daniel; Sanchez, Tom; Andon, Mark; Li, Hongfei.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 56, No. 2, 1992, p. 314-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Orwoll, E, Ware, M, Stribrska, L, Bikle, D, Sanchez, T, Andon, M & Li, H 1992, 'Effects of dietary protein deficiency on mineral metabolism and bone mineral density', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 314-319.
Orwoll, Eric ; Ware, Marsha ; Stribrska, Lenka ; Bikle, Daniel ; Sanchez, Tom ; Andon, Mark ; Li, Hongfei. / Effects of dietary protein deficiency on mineral metabolism and bone mineral density. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1992 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 314-319.
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