Effects of a hospital formulary on outpatient drug switching

Benjamin Sun, David W. Bates, Andrew Sussman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

• Objective: To assess the effect of an inpatient formulary on outpatient medication use. • Design: Retrospective analysis of claims and administrative data. • Setting and participants: Members of 2 capitated health care plans admitted to an academic tertiary care hospital in 2001-2002 who were using a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or statin not on the hospital formulary within 3 months prior to hospitalization. • Measurements: The primary outcome was postdischarge use of a hospital formulary PPI or statin. • Results: In 2001-2002, there were 139 patients who accounted for 177 admissions. There were 192 cases of nonformulary, preadmission use of a PPI or statin. A PPI or statin was ordered during hospitalization in 22% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-28%) of eligible cases; virtually all of these patients received the inpatient formulary equivalent. A discharge prescription for a formulary PPI or statin was given in 8% (95% CI, 4%-11%) of eligible cases, although only 1 patient (0.5%; 95% CI, 0%-2%) filled such a prescription. • Conclusion: These data suggest that an inpatient formulary has minimal effect on outpatient PPI or statin drug switching in a privately insured, managed care population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-463
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Outcomes Management
Volume12
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Hospital Formularies
Drug Substitution
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Formularies
Outpatients
Inpatients
Confidence Intervals
Prescriptions
Hospitalization
Insurance Claim Review
Managed Care Programs
Tertiary Healthcare
Tertiary Care Centers
Inhibitor
Drugs
Outpatient
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Effects of a hospital formulary on outpatient drug switching. / Sun, Benjamin; Bates, David W.; Sussman, Andrew.

In: Journal of Clinical Outcomes Management, Vol. 12, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 459-463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sun, Benjamin ; Bates, David W. ; Sussman, Andrew. / Effects of a hospital formulary on outpatient drug switching. In: Journal of Clinical Outcomes Management. 2005 ; Vol. 12, No. 9. pp. 459-463.
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