Effectiveness of simulation for improvement in self-efficacy among novice nurses

A meta-analysis

Ashley E. Franklin, Christopher Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influence of simulation on self-efficacy for novice nurses has been reported inconsistently in the literature. Effect sizes across studies were synthesized using random-effects meta-analyses. Simulation improved self-efficacy in one-group, pretest-posttest studies (Hedge's g = 1.21, 95% CI [0.63, 1.78]; p <0.001). Simulation also was favored over control teaching interventions in improving self-efficacy in studies with experimental designs (Hedge's g = 0.27, 95% CI [0.1, 0.44]; p = 0.002). In nonexperimen-tal designs, consistent conclusions about the influence of simulation were tempered by significant between-study differences in effects. Simulation is effective at increasing self-efficacy among novice nurses, compared with traditional control groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)607-614
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nursing Education
Volume53
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Meta-Analysis
nurse
Nurses
simulation
Teaching
Research Design
Control Groups
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effectiveness of simulation for improvement in self-efficacy among novice nurses : A meta-analysis. / Franklin, Ashley E.; Lee, Christopher.

In: Journal of Nursing Education, Vol. 53, No. 11, 2014, p. 607-614.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Franklin, Ashley E. ; Lee, Christopher. / Effectiveness of simulation for improvement in self-efficacy among novice nurses : A meta-analysis. In: Journal of Nursing Education. 2014 ; Vol. 53, No. 11. pp. 607-614.
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