Effectiveness of resident-prepared conferences in teaching imaging utilization guidelines to radiology residents

M. B. Mainiero, J. Collins, Steven Primack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of a resident-prepared conference series for teaching imaging utilization guidelines to radiology residents. Materials and Methods. Brown University radiology residents (n = 17) gave 61 presentations on imaging utilization to their colleagues during 16 1-hour conferences. The residents were later examined on the topics presented and surveyed about their familiarity with the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria, their exposure to issues of cost-effectiveness, and their degree of confidence in providing imaging consultation. The same examination and survey were administered to control residents from the University of Wisconsin (n = 14) and the Oregon Health Sciences University (n = 14). Scores were compared by using linear regression and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Results. Controlling for years in radiology residency, residents at Brown scored on average 16.0% (standard error = 2.2%) higher than residents at the other universities (P <.001). Controlling for institution, 3rd- and 4th-year residents scored on average 7.4% (standard error = 2.1%) higher than 1st- and 2nd-year residents (P = .001). Brown residents expressed more familiarity with American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria and appeared to have more exposure to cost-effectiveness issues in conferences than residents at Wisconsin or Oregon Health Sciences University (P <.005). Residents from the three universities did not differ in their level of confidence in providing imaging consultation. Conclusion. Resident-prepared conferences are an effective means of teaching imaging utilization guidelines to residents, but they do not affect the residents' perception of their ability to provide imaging consultation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)748-751
Number of pages4
JournalAcademic Radiology
Volume6
Issue number12 SUPPL. 8
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Radiology
Teaching
Guidelines
Referral and Consultation
Nonparametric Statistics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Aptitude
Health
Internship and Residency
Linear Models
Recognition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Education
  • Radiology and radiologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Effectiveness of resident-prepared conferences in teaching imaging utilization guidelines to radiology residents. / Mainiero, M. B.; Collins, J.; Primack, Steven.

In: Academic Radiology, Vol. 6, No. 12 SUPPL. 8, 1999, p. 748-751.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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