Effect of systemic beta-blockers, ace inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers on development of choroidal neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration

Akshay S. Thomas, Travis Redd, Thomas Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Recent studies have suggested that the use of systemic beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers can induce regression of choroidal neovascularization in rodent models. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if these agents have a protective effect against the development of choroidal neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration. Methods: In this single-center retrospective case-control study, the charts of 250 patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration were compared with those of 250 controls with dry age-related macular degeneration. Charts were reviewed for current and past use of beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers. Frequency tables were generated, and associations were examined using chi-square tests, t-tests, and multivariate logistic regression. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between rates of beta-blocker use (P = 0.57), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors use (P = 0.20), or angiotensin receptor blockers use (P = 0.61) between the 2 groups. Additionally, there was no statistically significant difference between rates of use of combinations of the above drugs between the two groups. Conclusion: Although there is growing evidence that beta-blockers, angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers can induce regression of choroidal neovascularization in rodent models, these medications do not seem to confer a protective effect against the development of choroidal neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1964-1968
Number of pages5
JournalRetina
Volume35
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Choroidal Neovascularization
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists
Macular Degeneration
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Rodentia
Enzyme Inhibitors
Drug Combinations
Chi-Square Distribution
Case-Control Studies
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • ACE inhibitor
  • Age-related macular degeneration
  • Angiotensin receptor blocker
  • Betablocker
  • Choroidal neovascularization.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Effect of systemic beta-blockers, ace inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers on development of choroidal neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration. / Thomas, Akshay S.; Redd, Travis; Hwang, Thomas.

In: Retina, Vol. 35, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 1964-1968.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Purpose: Recent studies have suggested that the use of systemic beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers can induce regression of choroidal neovascularization in rodent models. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if these agents have a protective effect against the development of choroidal neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration. Methods: In this single-center retrospective case-control study, the charts of 250 patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration were compared with those of 250 controls with dry age-related macular degeneration. Charts were reviewed for current and past use of beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers. Frequency tables were generated, and associations were examined using chi-square tests, t-tests, and multivariate logistic regression. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between rates of beta-blocker use (P = 0.57), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors use (P = 0.20), or angiotensin receptor blockers use (P = 0.61) between the 2 groups. Additionally, there was no statistically significant difference between rates of use of combinations of the above drugs between the two groups. Conclusion: Although there is growing evidence that beta-blockers, angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers can induce regression of choroidal neovascularization in rodent models, these medications do not seem to confer a protective effect against the development of choroidal neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

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