Effect of reinnervation on the degradation rate of junctional acetylcholine receptors synthesized in denervated skeletal muscles

S. L. Shyng, M. M. Salpeter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two populations of ACh receptors (AChRs) with different degradation rates have been shown to coexist in the postsynaptic membrane after denervation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). One population, consisting of the slowly degrading original AChRs inserted into the plasma membrane prior to denervation, has a degradation half-life (t1/2) of ∼8 d. This degradation rate accelerates after denervation (to a t1/2 ∼ 3 d), but can be decelerated back to the predenervation rate by reinnervation. The second population, the rapidly degrading new AChRs, which replace the degrading original AChRs at the NMJ after denervation, resembles embryonic AChRs, with a t1/2 of ∼ 1 d. In the present study, we report that the degradation rate of these new junctional AChRs is unaltered for 3-6 half-lives after reinnervation. We further report that a small amount (<10%) of slowly degrading AChRs (t1/2 ∼ 3 d) may also be synthesized in denervated muscle. We suggest that, unlike its effect on the original, slowly degrading AChRs, reinnervation does not modulate the degradation rate of the rapidly degrading new junctional AChRs. It merely regulates the ratio of rapidly to slowly degrading AChRs being synthesized and inserted at the NMJ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3905-3915
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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