Effect of pulsed xenon ultraviolet room disinfection devices on microbial counts for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and aerobic bacterial colonies

John E. Zeber, Christopher Pfeiffer, John W. Baddley, Jose Cadena-Zuluaga, Eileen M. Stock, Laurel A. Copeland, Janet Hendricks, Jwan Mohammadi, Marcos I. Restrepo, Chetan Jinadatha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Inadequate environmental disinfection represents a serious risk for health care–associated infections. Technologic advancements in disinfection practices, including no-touch devices, offer significant promise to improve infection control. We evaluated one such device, portable pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) units, on microbial burden during an implementation trial across 4 Veterans Affairs hospitals. Methods: Environmental samples were collected before and after terminal room cleaning: 2 facilities incorporated PX-UV disinfection into their cleaning protocols and 2 practiced manual disinfection only. Specimens from 5 high-touch surfaces were collected from rooms harboring methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or aerobic bacteria colonies (ABC). Unadjusted pre-post count reductions and negative binomial regression modeled PX-UV versus manual cleaning alone. Results: Seventy samples were collected. Overall, PX-UV reduced MRSA and ABC counts by 75.3% and 84.1%, respectively, versus only 25%-30% at control sites. Adjusting for baseline counts, manually cleaned rooms had significantly higher residual levels than PX-UV sites. Combined analyses revealed an incident rate ratio of 5.32 (P =.0024), with bedrails, tray tables, and toilet handrails also showing statistically superior PX-UV disinfection. Conclusions: This multicenter study demonstrates significantly reduced disinfection across several common pathogens in facilities using PX-UV devices. Clinical impact of laboratory reductions on infection rates was not assessed, representing a critical future research question. However, such approaches to routine cleaning suggest a practical strategy when integrated into daily hospital operations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)668-673
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Xenon
Disinfection
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Equipment and Supplies
Aerobic Bacteria
Touch
Veterans Hospitals
Infection Control
Infection
Multicenter Studies
Health

Keywords

  • aerobic colonies
  • Hospital-associated infections
  • implementation
  • methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
  • no-touch disinfection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Effect of pulsed xenon ultraviolet room disinfection devices on microbial counts for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and aerobic bacterial colonies. / Zeber, John E.; Pfeiffer, Christopher; Baddley, John W.; Cadena-Zuluaga, Jose; Stock, Eileen M.; Copeland, Laurel A.; Hendricks, Janet; Mohammadi, Jwan; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Jinadatha, Chetan.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 46, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 668-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zeber, John E. ; Pfeiffer, Christopher ; Baddley, John W. ; Cadena-Zuluaga, Jose ; Stock, Eileen M. ; Copeland, Laurel A. ; Hendricks, Janet ; Mohammadi, Jwan ; Restrepo, Marcos I. ; Jinadatha, Chetan. / Effect of pulsed xenon ultraviolet room disinfection devices on microbial counts for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and aerobic bacterial colonies. In: American Journal of Infection Control. 2018 ; Vol. 46, No. 6. pp. 668-673.
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