Effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation

M. T. Metzdorff, G. L. Grunkemeier, Albert Starr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of initial postischemic reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation was studied in the isolated working rat heart model. After baseline measurement of aortic flow rate, coronary flow rate, and heart rate, 40 hearts were subjected to 60 minutes of ischemic arrest at 15°C induced with a single dose of cold potassium cardioplegic solution. Hearts were then revived with a 10 minute period of nonworking reperfusion at 28°, 31°, 34°, or 37° C (10 hearts each), followed by 5 minutes of nonworking reperfusion at normothermia, followed by 30 minutes of working perfusion. Repeat measurements of function were obtained and postischemic release of creatine kinase into coronary effluent was determined. Recovery of aortic flow was significantly reduced at lower initial reperfusion temperatures (75% at 28°C versus 88% at 37°C) and the effect was approximately linear throughout the range studied (p <0.05). Release of creatine kinase into coronary effluent was greater at lower initial reperfusion temperatures (421 ImU/min/gm wet weight at 28°C versus 115 ImU/min/gm wet weight at 37°C), also in a linear manner (p <0.05). In this model, initial postischemic hypothermic reperfusion is deleterious to cellular integrity and functional recovery of the preserved myocardium. Studies in higher animals and humans are warranted to further evaluate the effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-550
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume91
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Reperfusion
Temperature
Creatine Kinase
Weights and Measures
Myocardium
Perfusion
Heart Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Metzdorff, M. T., Grunkemeier, G. L., & Starr, A. (1986). Effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 91(4), 545-550.

Effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation. / Metzdorff, M. T.; Grunkemeier, G. L.; Starr, Albert.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 91, No. 4, 1986, p. 545-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Metzdorff, MT, Grunkemeier, GL & Starr, A 1986, 'Effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation', Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 91, no. 4, pp. 545-550.
Metzdorff, M. T. ; Grunkemeier, G. L. ; Starr, Albert. / Effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 1986 ; Vol. 91, No. 4. pp. 545-550.
@article{0a5247b800fc441d89606d45f3c62200,
title = "Effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation",
abstract = "The effect of initial postischemic reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation was studied in the isolated working rat heart model. After baseline measurement of aortic flow rate, coronary flow rate, and heart rate, 40 hearts were subjected to 60 minutes of ischemic arrest at 15°C induced with a single dose of cold potassium cardioplegic solution. Hearts were then revived with a 10 minute period of nonworking reperfusion at 28°, 31°, 34°, or 37° C (10 hearts each), followed by 5 minutes of nonworking reperfusion at normothermia, followed by 30 minutes of working perfusion. Repeat measurements of function were obtained and postischemic release of creatine kinase into coronary effluent was determined. Recovery of aortic flow was significantly reduced at lower initial reperfusion temperatures (75{\%} at 28°C versus 88{\%} at 37°C) and the effect was approximately linear throughout the range studied (p <0.05). Release of creatine kinase into coronary effluent was greater at lower initial reperfusion temperatures (421 ImU/min/gm wet weight at 28°C versus 115 ImU/min/gm wet weight at 37°C), also in a linear manner (p <0.05). In this model, initial postischemic hypothermic reperfusion is deleterious to cellular integrity and functional recovery of the preserved myocardium. Studies in higher animals and humans are warranted to further evaluate the effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation.",
author = "Metzdorff, {M. T.} and Grunkemeier, {G. L.} and Albert Starr",
year = "1986",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "91",
pages = "545--550",
journal = "Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery",
issn = "0022-5223",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation

AU - Metzdorff, M. T.

AU - Grunkemeier, G. L.

AU - Starr, Albert

PY - 1986

Y1 - 1986

N2 - The effect of initial postischemic reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation was studied in the isolated working rat heart model. After baseline measurement of aortic flow rate, coronary flow rate, and heart rate, 40 hearts were subjected to 60 minutes of ischemic arrest at 15°C induced with a single dose of cold potassium cardioplegic solution. Hearts were then revived with a 10 minute period of nonworking reperfusion at 28°, 31°, 34°, or 37° C (10 hearts each), followed by 5 minutes of nonworking reperfusion at normothermia, followed by 30 minutes of working perfusion. Repeat measurements of function were obtained and postischemic release of creatine kinase into coronary effluent was determined. Recovery of aortic flow was significantly reduced at lower initial reperfusion temperatures (75% at 28°C versus 88% at 37°C) and the effect was approximately linear throughout the range studied (p <0.05). Release of creatine kinase into coronary effluent was greater at lower initial reperfusion temperatures (421 ImU/min/gm wet weight at 28°C versus 115 ImU/min/gm wet weight at 37°C), also in a linear manner (p <0.05). In this model, initial postischemic hypothermic reperfusion is deleterious to cellular integrity and functional recovery of the preserved myocardium. Studies in higher animals and humans are warranted to further evaluate the effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation.

AB - The effect of initial postischemic reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation was studied in the isolated working rat heart model. After baseline measurement of aortic flow rate, coronary flow rate, and heart rate, 40 hearts were subjected to 60 minutes of ischemic arrest at 15°C induced with a single dose of cold potassium cardioplegic solution. Hearts were then revived with a 10 minute period of nonworking reperfusion at 28°, 31°, 34°, or 37° C (10 hearts each), followed by 5 minutes of nonworking reperfusion at normothermia, followed by 30 minutes of working perfusion. Repeat measurements of function were obtained and postischemic release of creatine kinase into coronary effluent was determined. Recovery of aortic flow was significantly reduced at lower initial reperfusion temperatures (75% at 28°C versus 88% at 37°C) and the effect was approximately linear throughout the range studied (p <0.05). Release of creatine kinase into coronary effluent was greater at lower initial reperfusion temperatures (421 ImU/min/gm wet weight at 28°C versus 115 ImU/min/gm wet weight at 37°C), also in a linear manner (p <0.05). In this model, initial postischemic hypothermic reperfusion is deleterious to cellular integrity and functional recovery of the preserved myocardium. Studies in higher animals and humans are warranted to further evaluate the effect of initial reperfusion temperature on myocardial preservation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022573507&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022573507&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 3959573

AN - SCOPUS:0022573507

VL - 91

SP - 545

EP - 550

JO - Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

JF - Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

SN - 0022-5223

IS - 4

ER -