Effect of Galactose on Systemic Hemodynamics and Blood Flow Rate in Normal and Tumor Tissues in Rats

Donald J. DiPette, Kimberly A. Ward, Rakesh K. Jain, Nancy E. Kerr, Kathryn Schwarzenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of galactose on systemic hemodynamics and blood flow rate of Walker 256 carcinomas and several normal tissues of unanesthetized, unrestrained female Sprague-Dawley rats was measured, using the radio-active microsphere technique, prior to and at 30 and 60 min after galactose administration (6 g/kg body weight, i.v.). Whereas heart rate remained unchanged following injection, cardiac output (CO) and cardiac index decreased by 35% (P 0.05). Mean arterial pressure immediately decreased during the injection but then increased reaching a value 10% (P 0.05) above the baseline 30 min following injection. Stroke volume (SV) decreased by 30% (P 0.05) and total peripheral resistance increased by 65% (P 0.05). Redistribution of blood flow, expressed as %CO, among normal tissues was seen to the brain, kidneys, liver, jejunum, and hindlimb muscle and away from the pancreas, stomach, and skin. Changes in %CO to the spleen, colon, forelimb muscle, and peritumor tissue were not significant. Blood flow rate in most normal tissues either decreased or remained constant following injection. An exception was in the liver where blood flow significantly increased. Blood flow significantly decreased in the tumor (~60%) and this reduction in blood flow was larger than the reduction in CO. These results suggest that (a) the effect of galactose on systemic hemodynamics and blood flow rate are similar to those produced by glucose; (b) reduction in blood flow rate in tumors is due to both systemic and local effects; and (c) changes in blood flow to normal tissues should not be disregarded when using galactose in combination with hyperthermia and/or chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1476-1480
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Research
Volume48
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Galactose
Hemodynamics
Cardiac Output
Neoplasms
Injections
Walker Carcinoma 256
Muscles
Forelimb
Liver
Jejunum
Hindlimb
Radio
Microspheres
Vascular Resistance
Stroke Volume
Sprague Dawley Rats
Pancreas
Stomach
Arterial Pressure
Colon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Effect of Galactose on Systemic Hemodynamics and Blood Flow Rate in Normal and Tumor Tissues in Rats. / DiPette, Donald J.; Ward, Kimberly A.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Kerr, Nancy E.; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 48, No. 6, 01.01.1988, p. 1476-1480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DiPette, Donald J. ; Ward, Kimberly A. ; Jain, Rakesh K. ; Kerr, Nancy E. ; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn. / Effect of Galactose on Systemic Hemodynamics and Blood Flow Rate in Normal and Tumor Tissues in Rats. In: Cancer Research. 1988 ; Vol. 48, No. 6. pp. 1476-1480.
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