Effect of excessive weight gain with intensive therapy of type 1 diabetes on lipid levels and blood pressure: Results from the DCCT

Jonathan Purnell, John E. Hokanson, Santica M. Marcovina, Michael W. Steffes, Patricia A. Cleary, John D. Brunzell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Context. - Intensive treatment of type 1 diabetes results in greater weight gain than conventional treatment. Objective. - To determine the effect of this weight gain on lipid levels and blood pressure. Design. - Randomized controlled trial; ancillary study of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). Setting. - Twenty-one clinical centers. Participants. - The 1168 subjects enrolled in DCCT with type 1 diabetes who were aged 18 years or older at baseline. Intervention. - Randomized to receive either intensive (n = 586) or conventional (n = 582) diabetes treatment with a mean follow-up of 6.1 years. Main Outcome Measures. - Plasma lipid levels and blood pressure in each treatment group categorized by quartile of weight gain. Results. - With intensive treatment, subjects in the fourth quartile of weight gain had the highest body mass index (BMI) (a measure of weight adjusted for height), blood pressure, and levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and apolipoprotein B compared with the other weight gain quartiles with the greatest difference seen when compared with the first quartile (mean values for the highest and lowest quartiles: BMI. 31 vs 24 kg/m2; blood pressure, 120/77 mm Hg vs 113/73 mm Hg; triglyceride, 0.99 mmol/L vs 0.79 mmol/L [88 mg/dL vs 70 mg/dL]; LDL-C, 3.15 mmol/L vs 2.74 mmol/L [122 mg/dL vs 106 mg/dL]; and apolipoprotein B, 0.89 g/L vs 0.78 g/L; all P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-146
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume280
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 8 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Diabetes Complications
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Weight Gain
Blood Pressure
Lipids
Apolipoproteins B
LDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Therapeutics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Cholesterol
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effect of excessive weight gain with intensive therapy of type 1 diabetes on lipid levels and blood pressure : Results from the DCCT. / Purnell, Jonathan; Hokanson, John E.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Steffes, Michael W.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Brunzell, John D.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 280, No. 2, 08.07.1998, p. 140-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Purnell, Jonathan ; Hokanson, John E. ; Marcovina, Santica M. ; Steffes, Michael W. ; Cleary, Patricia A. ; Brunzell, John D. / Effect of excessive weight gain with intensive therapy of type 1 diabetes on lipid levels and blood pressure : Results from the DCCT. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1998 ; Vol. 280, No. 2. pp. 140-146.
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