Effect of emergency department crowding on outcomes of admitted patients

Benjamin Sun, Renee Y. Hsia, Robert E. Weiss, David Zingmond, Li Jung Liang, Weijuan Han, Heather McCreath, Steven M. Asch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

265 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study objective: Emergency department (ED) crowding is a prevalent health delivery problem and may adversely affect the outcomes of patients requiring admission. We assess the association of ED crowding with subsequent outcomes in a general population of hospitalized patients. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of patients admitted in 2007 through the EDs of nonfederal, acute care hospitals in California. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality. Secondary outcomes included hospital length of stay and costs. ED crowding was established by the proxy measure of ambulance diversion hours on the day of admission. To control for hospital-level confounders of ambulance diversion, we defined periods of high ED crowding as those days within the top quartile of diversion hours for a specific facility. Hierarchic regression models controlled for demographics, time variables, patient comorbidities, primary diagnosis, and hospital fixed effects. We used bootstrap sampling to estimate excess outcomes attributable to ED crowding. Results: We studied 995,379 ED visits resulting in admission to 187 hospitals. Patients who were admitted on days with high ED crowding experienced 5% greater odds of inpatient death (95% confidence interval [CI] 2% to 8%), 0.8% longer hospital length of stay (95% CI 0.5% to 1%), and 1% increased costs per admission (95% CI 0.7% to 2%). Excess outcomes attributable to periods of high ED crowding included 300 inpatient deaths (95% CI 200 to 500 inpatient deaths), 6,200 hospital days (95% CI 2,800 to 8,900 hospital days), and $17 million (95% CI $11 to $23 million) in costs. Conclusion: Periods of high ED crowding were associated with increased inpatient mortality and modest increases in length of stay and costs for admitted patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume61
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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Hospital Emergency Service
Inpatients
Confidence Intervals
Length of Stay
Ambulance Diversion
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality
Hospital Costs
Patient Admission
Proxy
Comorbidity
Cohort Studies
Demography
Health
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Effect of emergency department crowding on outcomes of admitted patients. / Sun, Benjamin; Hsia, Renee Y.; Weiss, Robert E.; Zingmond, David; Liang, Li Jung; Han, Weijuan; McCreath, Heather; Asch, Steven M.

In: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 61, No. 6, 06.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sun, B, Hsia, RY, Weiss, RE, Zingmond, D, Liang, LJ, Han, W, McCreath, H & Asch, SM 2013, 'Effect of emergency department crowding on outcomes of admitted patients', Annals of Emergency Medicine, vol. 61, no. 6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2012.10.026
Sun, Benjamin ; Hsia, Renee Y. ; Weiss, Robert E. ; Zingmond, David ; Liang, Li Jung ; Han, Weijuan ; McCreath, Heather ; Asch, Steven M. / Effect of emergency department crowding on outcomes of admitted patients. In: Annals of Emergency Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 61, No. 6.
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