Effect of cocaine injections on the neuroendocrine response to the serotonin agonist MK-212

Louis D. Van de Kar, Peter A. Rittenhouse, Patricia O'Connor, Thomas Palionis, Mark S. Brownfield, Stephanie J. Lent, Molly Carnes, Cynthia L. Bethea

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    15 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    This study was undertaken to examine whether several of the hormones that can be released by activation of serotonin receptors will be affected by long-term cocaine administration. Male rats received cocaine injections (15 mg/kg, IP) twice daily for 7 days. Forty-two hr after the last cocaine injection, the rats were challenged with increasing doses (0, 1, 5, 10 mg/kg, IP) of the 5-HT1/5-HT2 agonist MK-212 (6-chloro-2-[1-piperazinyll-pyrazine). The following observations were made: (1) cocaine reduced the rate of body weight gain; (2) cocaine inhibited the stimulatory effect of MK-212 on plasma vasopressin, oxytocin, and prolactin concentrations and on plasma renin activity and concentration; (3) cocaine did not inhibit the stimulatory effect of MK-212 on plasma ACTH or corticosterone concentrations. The data indicate that a wide-spectrum 5-HT (serotonin) agonist such as MK-212 can reveal differential neuroendocrine responses. This effect could be related to cocaine-induced changes in the different 5-HT receptor subtypes that regulate the secretion of these hormones.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)258-269
    Number of pages12
    JournalBiological Psychiatry
    Volume32
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 1 1992

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biological Psychiatry

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