Effect of clamp versus anastomotic-induced ischemia on critical ischemic time and survival of rat epigastric fasciocutaneous flap

Brett Chafin, Michael J. Belmont, Huma Quraishi, Nina Clovis, Mark K. Wax

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. There are many models used to explore ischemic-related phenomena. The rat epigastric fasciocutaneous flap model is the one most commonly used. Critical ischemic time is the maximum ischemic insult that tissue can undergo and still remain viable. Experimentally, ischemia is induced either by clamping the vascular pedicle or by dividing the pedicle then performing microvascular arterial and venous anastomosis. We sought to determine what effect the different methods of inducing ischemia have on the critical primary ischemic time and, thus, flap survival. Methods. A right 3 cm x 6 cm groin flap based on the inferior epigastric vessels was raised in each rat. Ischemic times of 4, 6, 8, or 10 hours were induced either by placing temporary occlusion clamps on each vessel of the vascular pedicle (island pedicle group) or by ligation and division of the pedicle with subsequent microvascular anastomosis (free flap group). Survival was assessed at 7 days. Results. The primary ischemic time at which one half of free flaps are predicted to die was calculated to be 7.60 hours, compared with 6.09 hours for the island pedicle flaps (p < .05). Conclusions. Fasciocutaneous flaps undergoing ligation and anastomosis are more resistant to ischemia than are those undergoing clamping of the pedicle. Possible etiologic factors responsible for this experimental finding are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-203
Number of pages6
JournalHead and Neck
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1999

Keywords

  • Anastomosis
  • Clamp
  • Fasciocutaneous flap
  • Ischemia
  • Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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