Educational Exposure to Transgender Patient Care in Plastic Surgery Training

Transgender Educational Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Gender dysphoria is estimated to occur in up to 0.9 percent of the U.S. population. With increasing awareness and decreasing stigma surrounding transgender issues, it is predicted that more patients will begin to seek medical and surgical transition. This study aims to determine the current state of transgender-related education in U.S. plastic surgery residency programs and to evaluate trainee perceptions regarding the importance of such training. Methods: Plastic surgery trainees from a representative sample of 21 U.S. training programs were asked to complete a cross-sectional eight-question survey between November of 2015 and January of 2016. Respondents were queried regarding demographics, transgender curricular exposure (didactic versus clinical), and perceived importance of training opportunities in transgender patient care. Results: A total of 322 residents or fellows responded to the survey (80 percent response rate) from four U.S. Census regions. Sixty-four percent of respondents had education on or direct exposure to transgender patient care during residency. Among those with experiences in gender-confirming surgery, more than half were exposed to chest and genital surgery. Overall, the majority of respondents believed that training in gender-confirming surgery is important, and 72 percent endorsed the necessity for gender-confirming surgery fellowship training opportunities. Conclusions: A significant number of plastic surgery trainees are exposed to transgender patient care, although exposure type is variable. The majority of trainees endorsed the importance of residency and fellowship training in gender-confirming surgery. To better serve the transgender population, formal fellowship training in gender-confirming surgery should be offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)944-953
Number of pages10
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume138
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Transgender Persons
Plastic Surgery
Patient Care
Internship and Residency
Education
Censuses
Population
Thorax
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Educational Exposure to Transgender Patient Care in Plastic Surgery Training. / Transgender Educational Study Group.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 138, No. 4, 01.10.2016, p. 944-953.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Transgender Educational Study Group. / Educational Exposure to Transgender Patient Care in Plastic Surgery Training. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 138, No. 4. pp. 944-953.
@article{093c3c72ee1542bfa756e7360d2eb045,
title = "Educational Exposure to Transgender Patient Care in Plastic Surgery Training",
abstract = "Background: Gender dysphoria is estimated to occur in up to 0.9 percent of the U.S. population. With increasing awareness and decreasing stigma surrounding transgender issues, it is predicted that more patients will begin to seek medical and surgical transition. This study aims to determine the current state of transgender-related education in U.S. plastic surgery residency programs and to evaluate trainee perceptions regarding the importance of such training. Methods: Plastic surgery trainees from a representative sample of 21 U.S. training programs were asked to complete a cross-sectional eight-question survey between November of 2015 and January of 2016. Respondents were queried regarding demographics, transgender curricular exposure (didactic versus clinical), and perceived importance of training opportunities in transgender patient care. Results: A total of 322 residents or fellows responded to the survey (80 percent response rate) from four U.S. Census regions. Sixty-four percent of respondents had education on or direct exposure to transgender patient care during residency. Among those with experiences in gender-confirming surgery, more than half were exposed to chest and genital surgery. Overall, the majority of respondents believed that training in gender-confirming surgery is important, and 72 percent endorsed the necessity for gender-confirming surgery fellowship training opportunities. Conclusions: A significant number of plastic surgery trainees are exposed to transgender patient care, although exposure type is variable. The majority of trainees endorsed the importance of residency and fellowship training in gender-confirming surgery. To better serve the transgender population, formal fellowship training in gender-confirming surgery should be offered.",
author = "{Transgender Educational Study Group} and Morrison, {Shane D.} and Chong, {H. Jonathan} and Dy, {Geolani W.} and Grant, {David W.} and Wilson, {Stelios C.} and Brower, {Jonathan P.} and Vedder, {Nicholas B.} and Jens Berli and Friedrich, {Jeffrey B.}",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/PRS.0000000000002559",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "138",
pages = "944--953",
journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
issn = "0032-1052",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Educational Exposure to Transgender Patient Care in Plastic Surgery Training

AU - Transgender Educational Study Group

AU - Morrison, Shane D.

AU - Chong, H. Jonathan

AU - Dy, Geolani W.

AU - Grant, David W.

AU - Wilson, Stelios C.

AU - Brower, Jonathan P.

AU - Vedder, Nicholas B.

AU - Berli, Jens

AU - Friedrich, Jeffrey B.

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Background: Gender dysphoria is estimated to occur in up to 0.9 percent of the U.S. population. With increasing awareness and decreasing stigma surrounding transgender issues, it is predicted that more patients will begin to seek medical and surgical transition. This study aims to determine the current state of transgender-related education in U.S. plastic surgery residency programs and to evaluate trainee perceptions regarding the importance of such training. Methods: Plastic surgery trainees from a representative sample of 21 U.S. training programs were asked to complete a cross-sectional eight-question survey between November of 2015 and January of 2016. Respondents were queried regarding demographics, transgender curricular exposure (didactic versus clinical), and perceived importance of training opportunities in transgender patient care. Results: A total of 322 residents or fellows responded to the survey (80 percent response rate) from four U.S. Census regions. Sixty-four percent of respondents had education on or direct exposure to transgender patient care during residency. Among those with experiences in gender-confirming surgery, more than half were exposed to chest and genital surgery. Overall, the majority of respondents believed that training in gender-confirming surgery is important, and 72 percent endorsed the necessity for gender-confirming surgery fellowship training opportunities. Conclusions: A significant number of plastic surgery trainees are exposed to transgender patient care, although exposure type is variable. The majority of trainees endorsed the importance of residency and fellowship training in gender-confirming surgery. To better serve the transgender population, formal fellowship training in gender-confirming surgery should be offered.

AB - Background: Gender dysphoria is estimated to occur in up to 0.9 percent of the U.S. population. With increasing awareness and decreasing stigma surrounding transgender issues, it is predicted that more patients will begin to seek medical and surgical transition. This study aims to determine the current state of transgender-related education in U.S. plastic surgery residency programs and to evaluate trainee perceptions regarding the importance of such training. Methods: Plastic surgery trainees from a representative sample of 21 U.S. training programs were asked to complete a cross-sectional eight-question survey between November of 2015 and January of 2016. Respondents were queried regarding demographics, transgender curricular exposure (didactic versus clinical), and perceived importance of training opportunities in transgender patient care. Results: A total of 322 residents or fellows responded to the survey (80 percent response rate) from four U.S. Census regions. Sixty-four percent of respondents had education on or direct exposure to transgender patient care during residency. Among those with experiences in gender-confirming surgery, more than half were exposed to chest and genital surgery. Overall, the majority of respondents believed that training in gender-confirming surgery is important, and 72 percent endorsed the necessity for gender-confirming surgery fellowship training opportunities. Conclusions: A significant number of plastic surgery trainees are exposed to transgender patient care, although exposure type is variable. The majority of trainees endorsed the importance of residency and fellowship training in gender-confirming surgery. To better serve the transgender population, formal fellowship training in gender-confirming surgery should be offered.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84988973189&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84988973189&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/PRS.0000000000002559

DO - 10.1097/PRS.0000000000002559

M3 - Article

VL - 138

SP - 944

EP - 953

JO - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

JF - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

SN - 0032-1052

IS - 4

ER -