Early assessment and support alliance connections: Community-based participatory research to develop a peer-based early psychosis web resource with young adults

Dora M. Raymaker, Tamara Sale, Mariam Rija, Nicholas Buekea, Nybelle Caruso, Ryan Melton, Natalie Cohrs, Veronica Gould, Christina Wall, Mirah Scharer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Young adults (YA) who have experienced early psychosis (EP) have valuable information about their recovery process yet are often left out of research. Objectives: We used a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach in partnership with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance (EASA) EP program and Portland State University to develop a peer-driven, web-based, recovery resource. Methods: We used our CBPR process to collaboratively develop the resource and conducted an iterative usability study to test and refine it. Lessons Learned: The resource was well-received and acces-sible. YA partners emphasize the importance of being prepared to learn about research and one’s self, being open to new experiences, and how being co-researchers can help with processing EP experiences for the benefit of one’s self and peers. Conclusions: Peer involvement in intervention development may increase usability. It benefits YA and adult co-researchers. We strongly recommend including YA who have experienced EP as co-researchers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-480
Number of pages10
JournalProgress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020

Keywords

  • Community-based participatory research
  • Early psychosis
  • Peers
  • Web accessibility
  • Web-based intervention
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

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