Dysphonia and dysphagia following the anterior approach to the cervical spine

C. P. Winslow, T. J. Winslow, Mark Wax

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Speech and swallowing dysfunctions are common following the anterior approach to the cervical spine. Despite functional morbidity and legal implications, the incidence and etiologic factors of these complications have not been adequately elucidated. Objective: To better define speech and swallowing dysfunction both in the quantitative and qualitative sense. Methods: A questionnaire was mailed to 497 patients who had undergone anterior cervical fusion or anterior cervical discectomy at a university hospital (study group). One hundred fifty questionnaires were sent to a control group. Results: The study group response rate was 46%; the control group response was 51%. The incidence of hoarseness in the study group was 51%; the incidence in the control group was 19%. The difference was statistically significant (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-55
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume127
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Dysphonia
Deglutition Disorders
Spine
Deglutition
Control Groups
Incidence
Diskectomy
Hoarseness
Morbidity
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Dysphonia and dysphagia following the anterior approach to the cervical spine. / Winslow, C. P.; Winslow, T. J.; Wax, Mark.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 127, No. 1, 2001, p. 51-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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