Dynamics of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secretion in cyclic Cushing's syndrome

Evidence for more than one abnormal ACTH biorhythm

R. M. Jordan, A. Ramos-Gabatin, John Kendall, D. Gaudette, R. C. Walls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have studied a 57-yr-old woman with cyclic Cushing's syndrome of apparent pituitary origin who had a predominant cycle of 2-6 days. The patient also demonstrated an abnormal circadian rhythm, with afternoon peaks of plasma ACTH and plasma cortisol. In addition to these abnormal biorhythms, Fourier analysis showed what appeared to be a separate 35-day cycle. After 35 days of consecutive urinary free cortisol measurement, the patient was given cyproheptadine. During therapy with this agent, the urinary free cortisol levels fell dramatically, but cyclic secretion continued, albeit with a diminished amplitude. During general anesthesia for a bilateral adrenalectomy, there was a striking increase in the plasma ACTH level, and the ACTH concentration remained high in both the immediate and late postoperative periods. These observations indicated that stress could overcome cyclic ACTH secretion and that cortisol exerted feedback suppression on ACTH secretion. Although this is the predictable response for classic pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome, it is of interest in cyclic Cushing's syndrome, since previous studies of this entity have implied that cortisol secretion is independent of stimulation or feedback.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-537
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume55
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cushing Syndrome
Periodicity
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
Hydrocortisone
Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion
Plasmas
Cyproheptadine
Feedback
Fourier analysis
Adrenalectomy
Fourier Analysis
Circadian Rhythm
Postoperative Period
General Anesthesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Dynamics of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secretion in cyclic Cushing's syndrome : Evidence for more than one abnormal ACTH biorhythm. / Jordan, R. M.; Ramos-Gabatin, A.; Kendall, John; Gaudette, D.; Walls, R. C.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 55, No. 3, 1982, p. 531-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jordan, R. M. ; Ramos-Gabatin, A. ; Kendall, John ; Gaudette, D. ; Walls, R. C. / Dynamics of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secretion in cyclic Cushing's syndrome : Evidence for more than one abnormal ACTH biorhythm. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1982 ; Vol. 55, No. 3. pp. 531-537.
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