Dying patients' need for emotional support and personalized care from physicians: Perspectives of patients with terminal illness, families, and health care providers

Marjorie D. Wenrich, J. Randall Curtis, Donna A. Ambrozy, Jan D. Carline, Sarah Shannon, Paul G. Ramsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study addressed the emotional and personal needs of dying patients and the ways physicians help or hinder these needs. Twenty focus groups were held with 137 individuals, including patients with chronic and terminal illnesses, family members, health care workers, and physicians. Content analyses were performed based on grounded theory. Emotional support and personalization were 2 of the 12 domains identified as important in end-of-life care. Components of emotional support were compassion, responsiveness to emotional needs, maintaining hope and a positive attitude, and providing comfort through touch. Components of personalization were treating the whole person and not just the disease, making the patient feel unique and special, and considering the patient's social situation. Although the levels of emotional support and personalization varied, there was a minimal level, defined by compassion and treating the whole person and not just the disease, that physicians should strive to meet in caring for all dying patients. Participants also identified intermediate and advanced levels of physician behavior that provide emotional and personal support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-246
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Health
Health Personnel
Physicians
Hope
Terminal Care
Touch
Focus Groups
Chronic Disease
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Emotional
  • End-of-life care
  • Physician competence
  • Qualitative research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Dying patients' need for emotional support and personalized care from physicians : Perspectives of patients with terminal illness, families, and health care providers. / Wenrich, Marjorie D.; Curtis, J. Randall; Ambrozy, Donna A.; Carline, Jan D.; Shannon, Sarah; Ramsey, Paul G.

In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.03.2003, p. 236-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wenrich, Marjorie D. ; Curtis, J. Randall ; Ambrozy, Donna A. ; Carline, Jan D. ; Shannon, Sarah ; Ramsey, Paul G. / Dying patients' need for emotional support and personalized care from physicians : Perspectives of patients with terminal illness, families, and health care providers. In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2003 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 236-246.
@article{87f9938129c44311b1d331393a963795,
title = "Dying patients' need for emotional support and personalized care from physicians: Perspectives of patients with terminal illness, families, and health care providers",
abstract = "This study addressed the emotional and personal needs of dying patients and the ways physicians help or hinder these needs. Twenty focus groups were held with 137 individuals, including patients with chronic and terminal illnesses, family members, health care workers, and physicians. Content analyses were performed based on grounded theory. Emotional support and personalization were 2 of the 12 domains identified as important in end-of-life care. Components of emotional support were compassion, responsiveness to emotional needs, maintaining hope and a positive attitude, and providing comfort through touch. Components of personalization were treating the whole person and not just the disease, making the patient feel unique and special, and considering the patient's social situation. Although the levels of emotional support and personalization varied, there was a minimal level, defined by compassion and treating the whole person and not just the disease, that physicians should strive to meet in caring for all dying patients. Participants also identified intermediate and advanced levels of physician behavior that provide emotional and personal support.",
keywords = "Emotional, End-of-life care, Physician competence, Qualitative research",
author = "Wenrich, {Marjorie D.} and Curtis, {J. Randall} and Ambrozy, {Donna A.} and Carline, {Jan D.} and Sarah Shannon and Ramsey, {Paul G.}",
year = "2003",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0885-3924(02)00694-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "236--246",
journal = "Journal of Pain and Symptom Management",
issn = "0885-3924",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dying patients' need for emotional support and personalized care from physicians

T2 - Perspectives of patients with terminal illness, families, and health care providers

AU - Wenrich, Marjorie D.

AU - Curtis, J. Randall

AU - Ambrozy, Donna A.

AU - Carline, Jan D.

AU - Shannon, Sarah

AU - Ramsey, Paul G.

PY - 2003/3/1

Y1 - 2003/3/1

N2 - This study addressed the emotional and personal needs of dying patients and the ways physicians help or hinder these needs. Twenty focus groups were held with 137 individuals, including patients with chronic and terminal illnesses, family members, health care workers, and physicians. Content analyses were performed based on grounded theory. Emotional support and personalization were 2 of the 12 domains identified as important in end-of-life care. Components of emotional support were compassion, responsiveness to emotional needs, maintaining hope and a positive attitude, and providing comfort through touch. Components of personalization were treating the whole person and not just the disease, making the patient feel unique and special, and considering the patient's social situation. Although the levels of emotional support and personalization varied, there was a minimal level, defined by compassion and treating the whole person and not just the disease, that physicians should strive to meet in caring for all dying patients. Participants also identified intermediate and advanced levels of physician behavior that provide emotional and personal support.

AB - This study addressed the emotional and personal needs of dying patients and the ways physicians help or hinder these needs. Twenty focus groups were held with 137 individuals, including patients with chronic and terminal illnesses, family members, health care workers, and physicians. Content analyses were performed based on grounded theory. Emotional support and personalization were 2 of the 12 domains identified as important in end-of-life care. Components of emotional support were compassion, responsiveness to emotional needs, maintaining hope and a positive attitude, and providing comfort through touch. Components of personalization were treating the whole person and not just the disease, making the patient feel unique and special, and considering the patient's social situation. Although the levels of emotional support and personalization varied, there was a minimal level, defined by compassion and treating the whole person and not just the disease, that physicians should strive to meet in caring for all dying patients. Participants also identified intermediate and advanced levels of physician behavior that provide emotional and personal support.

KW - Emotional

KW - End-of-life care

KW - Physician competence

KW - Qualitative research

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037334538&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037334538&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0885-3924(02)00694-2

DO - 10.1016/S0885-3924(02)00694-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 12614958

AN - SCOPUS:0037334538

VL - 25

SP - 236

EP - 246

JO - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

JF - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

SN - 0885-3924

IS - 3

ER -