Duration of membrane rupture and risk of perinatal transmission of HIV-1 in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

Amanda M. Cotter, Kathleen Brookfield, Lunthita M. Duthely, Victor H. Gonzalez Quintero, Jonell E. Potter, Mary J. O'Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether the duration of membrane rupture of 4 or more hours is a significant risk factor for perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). Study Design: This was a prospective cohort study of 717 HIV-infected pregnant women-infant pairs with a delivery viral load available who received prenatal care and delivered at our institution during the interval 1996-2008. Results: The cohort comprised 707 women receiving ART who delivered during this interval. The perinatal transmission rate was 1% in women with membranes ruptured for less than 4 hours and 1.9% when ruptured for 4 or more hours. For 493 women with a delivery viral load less than 1000 copies/mL receiving combination ART in pregnancy, there were no cases of perinatal transmission identified up to 25 hours of membrane rupture. Logistic regression demonstrated only a viral load above 10,000 copies/mL as an independent risk factor for perinatal transmission. Conclusion: Duration of membrane rupture of 4 or more hours is not a risk factor for perinatal transmission of HIV in women with a viral load less than 1000 copies/mL receiving combination ART.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume207
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Viral Load
HIV-1
Rupture
Membranes
HIV
Prenatal Care
Therapeutics
Pregnant Women
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Prospective Studies
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • antiretroviral therapy
  • duration of membrane rupture
  • perinatal transmission
  • pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Duration of membrane rupture and risk of perinatal transmission of HIV-1 in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. / Cotter, Amanda M.; Brookfield, Kathleen; Duthely, Lunthita M.; Gonzalez Quintero, Victor H.; Potter, Jonell E.; O'Sullivan, Mary J.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 207, No. 6, 12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cotter, Amanda M. ; Brookfield, Kathleen ; Duthely, Lunthita M. ; Gonzalez Quintero, Victor H. ; Potter, Jonell E. ; O'Sullivan, Mary J. / Duration of membrane rupture and risk of perinatal transmission of HIV-1 in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2012 ; Vol. 207, No. 6.
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