Dural arteriovenous fistula of the anterior condylar confluence and hypoglossal canal mimicking a jugular foramen tumor: Case report

James K. Liu, Kelly Mahaney, Stanley L. Barnwell, Sean O. McMenomey, Johnny B. Delashaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The anterior condylar confluence (ACC) is located on the external orifice of the canal of the hypoglossal nerve and provides multiple connections with the dural venous sinuses of the posterior fossa, internal jugular vein, and the vertebral venous plexus. Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the ACC and hypoglossal canal (anterior condylar vein) are extremely rare. The authors present a case involving an ACC DAVF and hypoglossal canal that mimicked a hypervascular jugular bulb tumor. This 53-year-old man presented with right hypoglossal nerve palsy. A right pulsatile tinnitus had resolved several months previously. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an enhancing right-sided jugular foramen lesion involving the hypoglossal canal. Cerebral angiography revealed a hypervascular lesion at the jugular bulb, with early venous drainage into the extracranial vertebral venous plexus. This was thought to represent either a glomus jugulare tumor or a DAVF. The patient underwent preoperative transarterial embolization followed by surgical exploration via a far-lateral transcondylar approach. At surgery, a DAVF was identified draining into the ACC and hypoglossal canal. The fistula was surgically obliterated, and this was confirmed on postoperative angiography. The patient's hypoglossal nerve palsy resolved. Dural arteriovenous fistulas of the ACC and hypoglossal canal are rare lesions that can present with isolated hypoglossal nerve palsies. They should be included in the differential diagnosis of hypervascular jugular bulb lesions. The authors review the anatomy of the ACC and discuss the literature on DAVFs involving the hypoglossal canal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-340
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume109
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

Fingerprint

Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations
Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases
Neck
Neoplasms
Glomus Jugulare Tumor
Hypoglossal Nerve
Cerebral Angiography
Tinnitus
Jugular Veins
Fistula
Drainage
Veins
Anatomy
Angiography
Differential Diagnosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Anterior condylar confluence
  • Dural arteriovenous fistula
  • Hypoglossal canal
  • Jugular foramen tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Dural arteriovenous fistula of the anterior condylar confluence and hypoglossal canal mimicking a jugular foramen tumor : Case report. / Liu, James K.; Mahaney, Kelly; Barnwell, Stanley L.; McMenomey, Sean O.; Delashaw, Johnny B.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 109, No. 2, 08.2008, p. 335-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, James K. ; Mahaney, Kelly ; Barnwell, Stanley L. ; McMenomey, Sean O. ; Delashaw, Johnny B. / Dural arteriovenous fistula of the anterior condylar confluence and hypoglossal canal mimicking a jugular foramen tumor : Case report. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2008 ; Vol. 109, No. 2. pp. 335-340.
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