Duplex ultrasound measurement of postprandial intestinal blood flow: Effect of meal composition

Gregory (Greg) Moneta, David C. Taylor, W. Scott Helton, Michael W. Mulholland, D. Eugene Strandness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

220 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Duplex ultrasound was used to evaluate the effects of 350-cal, 300-ml protein, fat, carbohydrate, and mixed (Ensure-Plus) liquid meals on celiac, superior mesenteric, and femoral artery blood flow in 7 healthy volunteers. Ingestion of separate water and mannitol solutions served as controls for volume and osmolarity. Duplex parameters of peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, mean velocity, and volume flow were determined before, and serially for 90 min after, ingestion of each test meal. Maximal changes were compared with baseline values. There were no significant changes in any of the blood flow parameters derived from the celiac or femoral arteries after any test meal ingested. In contrast, maximal changes in all superior mesenteric artery parameters were increased significantly over baseline (p <0.05) after each of the test meals except water, with end-diastolic velocity showing proportionally the greatest increase. The study demonstrates that duplex ultrasound can provide a noninvasive means of studying the reactivity of the splanchnic arterial circulation to different stimuli and documents differing blood flow responses to variation of nutrients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1294-1301
Number of pages8
JournalGastroenterology
Volume95
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Meals
Superior Mesenteric Artery
Femoral Artery
Eating
Splanchnic Circulation
Celiac Artery
Water
Mannitol
Abdomen
Osmolar Concentration
Healthy Volunteers
Fats
Carbohydrates
Food
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Moneta, G. G., Taylor, D. C., Helton, W. S., Mulholland, M. W., & Strandness, D. E. (1988). Duplex ultrasound measurement of postprandial intestinal blood flow: Effect of meal composition. Gastroenterology, 95(5), 1294-1301.

Duplex ultrasound measurement of postprandial intestinal blood flow : Effect of meal composition. / Moneta, Gregory (Greg); Taylor, David C.; Helton, W. Scott; Mulholland, Michael W.; Strandness, D. Eugene.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 95, No. 5, 1988, p. 1294-1301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moneta, GG, Taylor, DC, Helton, WS, Mulholland, MW & Strandness, DE 1988, 'Duplex ultrasound measurement of postprandial intestinal blood flow: Effect of meal composition', Gastroenterology, vol. 95, no. 5, pp. 1294-1301.
Moneta, Gregory (Greg) ; Taylor, David C. ; Helton, W. Scott ; Mulholland, Michael W. ; Strandness, D. Eugene. / Duplex ultrasound measurement of postprandial intestinal blood flow : Effect of meal composition. In: Gastroenterology. 1988 ; Vol. 95, No. 5. pp. 1294-1301.
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