Dramatic decreases in mortality from laparoscopic colon resections based on data from the nationwide inpatient sample

Molly M. Cone, Daniel Herzig, Brian S. Diggs, James Dolan, Jennifer D. Rea, Karen Deveney, Kim Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the mortality rate and associated factors for laparoscopic and open colectomy as derived from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Design: Retrospective cohort. Setting: Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Patients: Between 2002 and 2007, the Nationwide Inpatient Sample estimated 1 314 696 patients underwent colectomy in the United States. Most (n=1 231 184) were open, but 83 512 were laparoscopic. Patients who underwent a laparoscopic procedure that was converted to open were analyzed within the laparoscopic group on an intention-to-treat basis. Main Outcome Measure: Mortality rate. Using a logistic regression model, patient and institutional characteristics were analyzed and evaluated for significant associations with in-hospital mortality. Results: In a multivariate analysis, significant predictors of increased mortality included older age, male sex, lower socioeconomic status, comorbidities, and emergency or transfer admission. Additionally, a laparoscopic approach was an independent predictor of decreased mortality when compared with open colectomy (relative risk, 0.51; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)594-599
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume146
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Colectomy
Inpatients
Colon
Mortality
Logistic Models
Databases
Hospital Mortality
Social Class
Comorbidity
Emergencies
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Dramatic decreases in mortality from laparoscopic colon resections based on data from the nationwide inpatient sample. / Cone, Molly M.; Herzig, Daniel; Diggs, Brian S.; Dolan, James; Rea, Jennifer D.; Deveney, Karen; Lu, Kim.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 146, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 594-599.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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