Dose-response effects of omega-3 fatty acids on triglycerides, inflammation, and endothelial function in healthy persons with moderate hypertriglyceridemia

Ann C. Skulas-Ray, Penny M. Kris-Etherton, William Harris, John P. Vanden Heuvel, Paul R. Wagner, Sheila G. West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

181 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality at a dose of ≈1 g/d. Studies using higher doses have shown evidence of reduced inflammation and improved endothelial function. Few studies have compared these doses. Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the effects of a nutritional dose of EPA+DHA (0.85 g/d) with those of a pharmaceutical dose (3.4 g/d) on serum triglycerides, inflammatory markers, and endothelial function in healthy subjects with moderately elevated triglycerides. Design: This was a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, 3-period crossover trial (8 wk of treatment, 6 wk of washout) that compared the effects of 0.85 and 3.4 g EPA+DHA/d in 23 men and 3 postmenopausal women with moderate hypertriglyceridemia (150-500 mg/dL). Results: The higher dose of EPA+DHA lowered triglycerides by 27% compared with placebo (mean ± SEM: 173 ± 17.5 compared with 237 ± 17.5 mg/dL; P = 0.002), whereas no effect of the lower dose was observed on lipids. No effects on cholesterol (total, LDL, and HDL), endothelial function [as assessed by flow-mediated dilation, peripheral arterial tonometry/EndoPAT (Itamar Medical Ltd, Caesarea, Israel), or Doppler measures of hyperemia], inflammatory markers (interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein), or the expression of inflammatory cytokine genes in isolated lymphocytes were observed. Conclusion: The higher dose (3.4 g/d) of EPA+DHA significantly lowered triglycerides, but neither dose improved endothelial function or inflammatory status over 8 wk in healthy adults with moderate hypertriglyceridemia. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials. gov as NCT00504309.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-252
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume93
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Hypertriglyceridemia
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Triglycerides
Inflammation
Placebos
Hyperemia
Manometry
Israel
Interleukin-1
C-Reactive Protein
LDL Cholesterol
Cross-Over Studies
HDL Cholesterol
Dilatation
Interleukin-6
Healthy Volunteers
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Dose-response effects of omega-3 fatty acids on triglycerides, inflammation, and endothelial function in healthy persons with moderate hypertriglyceridemia. / Skulas-Ray, Ann C.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; Harris, William; Vanden Heuvel, John P.; Wagner, Paul R.; West, Sheila G.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 93, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 243-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Skulas-Ray, Ann C. ; Kris-Etherton, Penny M. ; Harris, William ; Vanden Heuvel, John P. ; Wagner, Paul R. ; West, Sheila G. / Dose-response effects of omega-3 fatty acids on triglycerides, inflammation, and endothelial function in healthy persons with moderate hypertriglyceridemia. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2011 ; Vol. 93, No. 2. pp. 243-252.
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