Does the association between early life growth and later obesity differ by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status? A systematic review

Sarah B. Andrea, Elizabeth R. Hooker, Lynne C. Messer, Thomas Tandy, Janne Heinonen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Rapid growth during infancy predicts higher risk of obesity later in childhood. The association between patterns of early life growth and later obesity may differ by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status (SES), but prior evidence syntheses do not consider vulnerable subpopulations. Methods: We systemically reviewed published studies that explored patterns of early life growth (0-24 months of age) as predictors of later obesity (>24 months) that were either conducted in racial/ethnic minority or low-SES study populations or assessed effect modification of this association by race/ethnicity or SES. Literature searches were conducted in PubMed and SocINDEX. Results: Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. Faster growth during the first 2 years of life was consistently associated with later obesity irrespective of definition and timing of exposure and outcome measures. Associations were strongest in populations composed of greater proportions of racial/ethnic minority and/or low-SES children. For example, ORs ranged from 1.17 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.24) in a heterogeneous population to 9.24 (95% CI: 3.73, 22.9) in an entirely low-SES nonwhite population. Conclusions: The impact of rapid growth in infancy on later obesity may differ by social stratification factors such as race/ethnicity and family income. More robust and inclusive studies examining these associations are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Social Class
Obesity
Growth
Population
Pediatric Obesity
PubMed
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Continental population groups
  • Ethnic groups
  • Growth and development
  • Infant
  • Overweight
  • Review [Publication type]
  • Social environment
  • Socioeconomic factors
  • Weight gain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Does the association between early life growth and later obesity differ by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status? A systematic review. / Andrea, Sarah B.; Hooker, Elizabeth R.; Messer, Lynne C.; Tandy, Thomas; Heinonen, Janne.

In: Annals of Epidemiology, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: Rapid growth during infancy predicts higher risk of obesity later in childhood. The association between patterns of early life growth and later obesity may differ by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status (SES), but prior evidence syntheses do not consider vulnerable subpopulations. Methods: We systemically reviewed published studies that explored patterns of early life growth (0-24 months of age) as predictors of later obesity (>24 months) that were either conducted in racial/ethnic minority or low-SES study populations or assessed effect modification of this association by race/ethnicity or SES. Literature searches were conducted in PubMed and SocINDEX. Results: Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. Faster growth during the first 2 years of life was consistently associated with later obesity irrespective of definition and timing of exposure and outcome measures. Associations were strongest in populations composed of greater proportions of racial/ethnic minority and/or low-SES children. For example, ORs ranged from 1.17 (95{\%} CI: 1.11, 1.24) in a heterogeneous population to 9.24 (95{\%} CI: 3.73, 22.9) in an entirely low-SES nonwhite population. Conclusions: The impact of rapid growth in infancy on later obesity may differ by social stratification factors such as race/ethnicity and family income. More robust and inclusive studies examining these associations are needed.",
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AU - Heinonen, Janne

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AB - Purpose: Rapid growth during infancy predicts higher risk of obesity later in childhood. The association between patterns of early life growth and later obesity may differ by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status (SES), but prior evidence syntheses do not consider vulnerable subpopulations. Methods: We systemically reviewed published studies that explored patterns of early life growth (0-24 months of age) as predictors of later obesity (>24 months) that were either conducted in racial/ethnic minority or low-SES study populations or assessed effect modification of this association by race/ethnicity or SES. Literature searches were conducted in PubMed and SocINDEX. Results: Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. Faster growth during the first 2 years of life was consistently associated with later obesity irrespective of definition and timing of exposure and outcome measures. Associations were strongest in populations composed of greater proportions of racial/ethnic minority and/or low-SES children. For example, ORs ranged from 1.17 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.24) in a heterogeneous population to 9.24 (95% CI: 3.73, 22.9) in an entirely low-SES nonwhite population. Conclusions: The impact of rapid growth in infancy on later obesity may differ by social stratification factors such as race/ethnicity and family income. More robust and inclusive studies examining these associations are needed.

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