Does sex influence publication productivity among colorectal surgeons participating in fellowship training programs?

Cristina B. Geltzeiler, Katherine A. Kelley, Priya Srikanth, Karen Deveney, Sarah Diamond, Charles Thomas, Brintha Enestvedt, Vassiliki Tsikitis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Underrepresentation of highly ranked women in academic surgery is recognized. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine whether sex differences exist in faculty representation, academic rank, and publication productivity among colorectal faculty in fellowship programs. DESIGN: American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons fellowship program faculty were identified. Bibliometric data were obtained for each faculty member, including Hirsch index, the Hirsch index divided by research career duration, and number of publications. Linear mixed-effect regression models were constructed to determine the association between the Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration and sex, when controlling for institutional measures. A subset analysis of academic faculty examined the association between academic rank, sex, and Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration. SETTINGS: Colorectal fellowship programs, defined as academic, satellite-academic, and nonacademic, were evaluated. RESULTS: Three hundred fifty-eight faculty members were examined across 55 training programs; 22% (n = 77) were women and 78% (n = 281) were men. Sixty-one percent (n = 220) practiced in an academic setting, 23% (n = 84) in a satellite-academic setting, and 15% (n = 54) in a nonacademic setting. There was no difference in median number of publications between sexes (15 vs 10, p = 0.33); men, however, had longer careers (18 vs 11 years, p < 0.001). When controlling for confounders, there was no difference in the Hirsch index (p = 0.42) or the Hirsch index divided by research career duration (p = 0.73) between sexes. Academic rank was significantly associated with Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration (p < 0.001) after controlling for sex. LIMITATIONS: Our assessment of association between publication productivity and academic rank was only possible in the subset of academic faculty. In addition, this study is limited by its retrospective nature. CONCLUSIONS: We found no difference in median number of publications between men and women. When controlling for possible confounders, sex was not a significant predictor of a faculty member's publication productivity, as measured by the Hirsch index or the Hirsch index divided by research career duration; academic rank, however, was.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)537-543
Number of pages7
JournalDiseases of the Colon and Rectum
Volume60
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Publications
Education
Research
Bibliometrics
Surgeons
Sex Characteristics

Keywords

  • Colorectal surgery
  • Fellowship training programs
  • Publication productivity
  • Sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Does sex influence publication productivity among colorectal surgeons participating in fellowship training programs? / Geltzeiler, Cristina B.; Kelley, Katherine A.; Srikanth, Priya; Deveney, Karen; Diamond, Sarah; Thomas, Charles; Enestvedt, Brintha; Tsikitis, Vassiliki.

In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Vol. 60, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 537-543.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0cf9625f3d99428d8662b61f06ce96e2,
title = "Does sex influence publication productivity among colorectal surgeons participating in fellowship training programs?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Underrepresentation of highly ranked women in academic surgery is recognized. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine whether sex differences exist in faculty representation, academic rank, and publication productivity among colorectal faculty in fellowship programs. DESIGN: American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons fellowship program faculty were identified. Bibliometric data were obtained for each faculty member, including Hirsch index, the Hirsch index divided by research career duration, and number of publications. Linear mixed-effect regression models were constructed to determine the association between the Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration and sex, when controlling for institutional measures. A subset analysis of academic faculty examined the association between academic rank, sex, and Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration. SETTINGS: Colorectal fellowship programs, defined as academic, satellite-academic, and nonacademic, were evaluated. RESULTS: Three hundred fifty-eight faculty members were examined across 55 training programs; 22{\%} (n = 77) were women and 78{\%} (n = 281) were men. Sixty-one percent (n = 220) practiced in an academic setting, 23{\%} (n = 84) in a satellite-academic setting, and 15{\%} (n = 54) in a nonacademic setting. There was no difference in median number of publications between sexes (15 vs 10, p = 0.33); men, however, had longer careers (18 vs 11 years, p < 0.001). When controlling for confounders, there was no difference in the Hirsch index (p = 0.42) or the Hirsch index divided by research career duration (p = 0.73) between sexes. Academic rank was significantly associated with Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration (p < 0.001) after controlling for sex. LIMITATIONS: Our assessment of association between publication productivity and academic rank was only possible in the subset of academic faculty. In addition, this study is limited by its retrospective nature. CONCLUSIONS: We found no difference in median number of publications between men and women. When controlling for possible confounders, sex was not a significant predictor of a faculty member's publication productivity, as measured by the Hirsch index or the Hirsch index divided by research career duration; academic rank, however, was.",
keywords = "Colorectal surgery, Fellowship training programs, Publication productivity, Sex",
author = "Geltzeiler, {Cristina B.} and Kelley, {Katherine A.} and Priya Srikanth and Karen Deveney and Sarah Diamond and Charles Thomas and Brintha Enestvedt and Vassiliki Tsikitis",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/DCR.0000000000000746",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "537--543",
journal = "Diseases of the Colon and Rectum",
issn = "0012-3706",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does sex influence publication productivity among colorectal surgeons participating in fellowship training programs?

AU - Geltzeiler, Cristina B.

AU - Kelley, Katherine A.

AU - Srikanth, Priya

AU - Deveney, Karen

AU - Diamond, Sarah

AU - Thomas, Charles

AU - Enestvedt, Brintha

AU - Tsikitis, Vassiliki

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Underrepresentation of highly ranked women in academic surgery is recognized. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine whether sex differences exist in faculty representation, academic rank, and publication productivity among colorectal faculty in fellowship programs. DESIGN: American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons fellowship program faculty were identified. Bibliometric data were obtained for each faculty member, including Hirsch index, the Hirsch index divided by research career duration, and number of publications. Linear mixed-effect regression models were constructed to determine the association between the Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration and sex, when controlling for institutional measures. A subset analysis of academic faculty examined the association between academic rank, sex, and Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration. SETTINGS: Colorectal fellowship programs, defined as academic, satellite-academic, and nonacademic, were evaluated. RESULTS: Three hundred fifty-eight faculty members were examined across 55 training programs; 22% (n = 77) were women and 78% (n = 281) were men. Sixty-one percent (n = 220) practiced in an academic setting, 23% (n = 84) in a satellite-academic setting, and 15% (n = 54) in a nonacademic setting. There was no difference in median number of publications between sexes (15 vs 10, p = 0.33); men, however, had longer careers (18 vs 11 years, p < 0.001). When controlling for confounders, there was no difference in the Hirsch index (p = 0.42) or the Hirsch index divided by research career duration (p = 0.73) between sexes. Academic rank was significantly associated with Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration (p < 0.001) after controlling for sex. LIMITATIONS: Our assessment of association between publication productivity and academic rank was only possible in the subset of academic faculty. In addition, this study is limited by its retrospective nature. CONCLUSIONS: We found no difference in median number of publications between men and women. When controlling for possible confounders, sex was not a significant predictor of a faculty member's publication productivity, as measured by the Hirsch index or the Hirsch index divided by research career duration; academic rank, however, was.

AB - BACKGROUND: Underrepresentation of highly ranked women in academic surgery is recognized. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine whether sex differences exist in faculty representation, academic rank, and publication productivity among colorectal faculty in fellowship programs. DESIGN: American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons fellowship program faculty were identified. Bibliometric data were obtained for each faculty member, including Hirsch index, the Hirsch index divided by research career duration, and number of publications. Linear mixed-effect regression models were constructed to determine the association between the Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration and sex, when controlling for institutional measures. A subset analysis of academic faculty examined the association between academic rank, sex, and Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration. SETTINGS: Colorectal fellowship programs, defined as academic, satellite-academic, and nonacademic, were evaluated. RESULTS: Three hundred fifty-eight faculty members were examined across 55 training programs; 22% (n = 77) were women and 78% (n = 281) were men. Sixty-one percent (n = 220) practiced in an academic setting, 23% (n = 84) in a satellite-academic setting, and 15% (n = 54) in a nonacademic setting. There was no difference in median number of publications between sexes (15 vs 10, p = 0.33); men, however, had longer careers (18 vs 11 years, p < 0.001). When controlling for confounders, there was no difference in the Hirsch index (p = 0.42) or the Hirsch index divided by research career duration (p = 0.73) between sexes. Academic rank was significantly associated with Hirsch index and the Hirsch index divided by research career duration (p < 0.001) after controlling for sex. LIMITATIONS: Our assessment of association between publication productivity and academic rank was only possible in the subset of academic faculty. In addition, this study is limited by its retrospective nature. CONCLUSIONS: We found no difference in median number of publications between men and women. When controlling for possible confounders, sex was not a significant predictor of a faculty member's publication productivity, as measured by the Hirsch index or the Hirsch index divided by research career duration; academic rank, however, was.

KW - Colorectal surgery

KW - Fellowship training programs

KW - Publication productivity

KW - Sex

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85028499937&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85028499937&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/DCR.0000000000000746

DO - 10.1097/DCR.0000000000000746

M3 - Article

VL - 60

SP - 537

EP - 543

JO - Diseases of the Colon and Rectum

JF - Diseases of the Colon and Rectum

SN - 0012-3706

IS - 5

ER -