Does peritoneal mobilization increase laparoscopic acidosis?

Adrian E. Ortega, Nicole Baril, Salvador Rivera Lara, Timothy Liem, Gary Anthone, Robert W. Beart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: It was hypothesized that laparoscopic colon surgery may be associated with increased absorption of CO2 resulting from mobilization of lateral peritoneal reflections. METHODS: Six pigs underwent laparotomy with removal of a measured quadrant of peritoneum before insufflation to 15 mmHg with CO2. Six paired control animals also underwent insufflation with CO2 to 15 mmHg. Measurements of the end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2), arterial blood gas analysis for CO2(PaCO2), and pH were performed before insufflation, at 5 and 10 minutes following insufflation, then at successive 15-minute intervals for a total of two hours, and 15 minutes following desufflation. No attempt was made to correct the hypercarbia by increasing minute ventilation. RESULTS: PaCO2 reached its maximum level at two hours with values of 70.77±5.54 mmHg and 64.62±5.18 mmHg in the peritonectomized and control groups, respectively. PetCO2 also peaked at two hours to 60±13 mmHg for the study group and 54±11 mmHg for controls. pH reached its nadir at two hours, falling from a baseline of 7.45±0.08 to 7.23±0.09 in the study group, and from 7.42±0.04 to 7.24 ±0.04 in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups for any of the parameters measured at each time interval. CONCLUSIONS: The hypothesis that peritonectomy produces greater CO2 absorption during CO2 pneumoperitoneum was disproved under these experimental conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1296-1300
Number of pages5
JournalDiseases of the Colon & Rectum
Volume38
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Insufflation
Acidosis
Control Groups
Blood Gas Analysis
Pneumoperitoneum
Hypercapnia
Peritoneum
Laparoscopy
Laparotomy
Ventilation
Colon
Swine

Keywords

  • Carbon dioxide
  • Hypercarbia
  • Laparoscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Ortega, A. E., Baril, N., Lara, S. R., Liem, T., Anthone, G., & Beart, R. W. (1995). Does peritoneal mobilization increase laparoscopic acidosis? Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, 38(12), 1296-1300. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02049155

Does peritoneal mobilization increase laparoscopic acidosis? / Ortega, Adrian E.; Baril, Nicole; Lara, Salvador Rivera; Liem, Timothy; Anthone, Gary; Beart, Robert W.

In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, Vol. 38, No. 12, 12.1995, p. 1296-1300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ortega, AE, Baril, N, Lara, SR, Liem, T, Anthone, G & Beart, RW 1995, 'Does peritoneal mobilization increase laparoscopic acidosis?', Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, vol. 38, no. 12, pp. 1296-1300. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02049155
Ortega, Adrian E. ; Baril, Nicole ; Lara, Salvador Rivera ; Liem, Timothy ; Anthone, Gary ; Beart, Robert W. / Does peritoneal mobilization increase laparoscopic acidosis?. In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum. 1995 ; Vol. 38, No. 12. pp. 1296-1300.
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N2 - PURPOSE: It was hypothesized that laparoscopic colon surgery may be associated with increased absorption of CO2 resulting from mobilization of lateral peritoneal reflections. METHODS: Six pigs underwent laparotomy with removal of a measured quadrant of peritoneum before insufflation to 15 mmHg with CO2. Six paired control animals also underwent insufflation with CO2 to 15 mmHg. Measurements of the end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2), arterial blood gas analysis for CO2(PaCO2), and pH were performed before insufflation, at 5 and 10 minutes following insufflation, then at successive 15-minute intervals for a total of two hours, and 15 minutes following desufflation. No attempt was made to correct the hypercarbia by increasing minute ventilation. RESULTS: PaCO2 reached its maximum level at two hours with values of 70.77±5.54 mmHg and 64.62±5.18 mmHg in the peritonectomized and control groups, respectively. PetCO2 also peaked at two hours to 60±13 mmHg for the study group and 54±11 mmHg for controls. pH reached its nadir at two hours, falling from a baseline of 7.45±0.08 to 7.23±0.09 in the study group, and from 7.42±0.04 to 7.24 ±0.04 in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups for any of the parameters measured at each time interval. CONCLUSIONS: The hypothesis that peritonectomy produces greater CO2 absorption during CO2 pneumoperitoneum was disproved under these experimental conditions.

AB - PURPOSE: It was hypothesized that laparoscopic colon surgery may be associated with increased absorption of CO2 resulting from mobilization of lateral peritoneal reflections. METHODS: Six pigs underwent laparotomy with removal of a measured quadrant of peritoneum before insufflation to 15 mmHg with CO2. Six paired control animals also underwent insufflation with CO2 to 15 mmHg. Measurements of the end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2), arterial blood gas analysis for CO2(PaCO2), and pH were performed before insufflation, at 5 and 10 minutes following insufflation, then at successive 15-minute intervals for a total of two hours, and 15 minutes following desufflation. No attempt was made to correct the hypercarbia by increasing minute ventilation. RESULTS: PaCO2 reached its maximum level at two hours with values of 70.77±5.54 mmHg and 64.62±5.18 mmHg in the peritonectomized and control groups, respectively. PetCO2 also peaked at two hours to 60±13 mmHg for the study group and 54±11 mmHg for controls. pH reached its nadir at two hours, falling from a baseline of 7.45±0.08 to 7.23±0.09 in the study group, and from 7.42±0.04 to 7.24 ±0.04 in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups for any of the parameters measured at each time interval. CONCLUSIONS: The hypothesis that peritonectomy produces greater CO2 absorption during CO2 pneumoperitoneum was disproved under these experimental conditions.

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