Does more health care improve health among older adults? A longitudinal analysis

Ezra Golberstein, Jersey Liang, Ana Quinones, Fredric D. Wolinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This research assesses the association of health services use with subsequent physical health among older Americans, adjusting for the confounding between health care use and prior health. Method: Longitudinal data are from the Survey on Assets and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD). Linear and logistic regressions are used to model the linkages between medical care use and health outcomes, including self-rated health, functional limitations, and mortality. Results: There is limited evidence that increased health care use is correlated with improved subsequent health. Increased use of medical care is largely associated with poorer health outcomes. Moreover, there are no significant interaction effects of health care use and baseline health on Activities of Daily Living and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, despite the existence of a significant but very small interaction effect on self-rated health. Conclusions: The findings have implications for the quality of care delivered by the American health care system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)888-906
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

health care
Delivery of Health Care
Health
health
Activities of Daily Living
medical care
Quality of Health Care
interaction
Health Services
Longitudinal Studies
Linear Models
Logistic Models
assets
health service
mortality
logistics
Mortality
regression
Research
evidence

Keywords

  • Health outcomes
  • Older Americans
  • Quality of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Aging
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Does more health care improve health among older adults? A longitudinal analysis. / Golberstein, Ezra; Liang, Jersey; Quinones, Ana; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 19, No. 6, 12.2007, p. 888-906.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Golberstein, Ezra ; Liang, Jersey ; Quinones, Ana ; Wolinsky, Fredric D. / Does more health care improve health among older adults? A longitudinal analysis. In: Journal of Aging and Health. 2007 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 888-906.
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