Does familiarity with CDC guidelines, continuing education, and provider characteristics influence adherence to chronic pain management practices and opioid prescribing?

Jean C. McCalmont, Kim Jones, Robert (Rob) Bennett, Ronald Friend

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives: (1) To assess providers’ experience and knowledge of chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) management. (2) To assess providers’ utilization of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2016 Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. (3) To assess the influence of the 2016 CDC guideline on provider confidence in managing CNCP and adherence to the CDC recommendations. Methods: A cross-sectional, web-based survey conducted with 417 Oregon prescribing providers, divided into three continuing medical education (CME) groups composed of minimal (0-3), moderate (4-10), and high (≥11) hours of training. Results: The three CME groups were associated with increased use of CDC opioid recommended practices (29.4, 34.2, 38.8; p = 0.001; scale 0-50), opioid conversion confidence (5.5, 6.5, 7.4; p < 0.001; scale 0-9), and confidence in pain management (5.5, 5.9, 6.9; p < 0.001, scale 0-9). Slightly more providers utilized CDC recommended practices than did not (57 vs 43 percent). However, CME groups differed substantially in utilization of CDC practices (42 vs 57 vs 72 percent; p < 0.001). Neither providers’ profession (physician vs nurse practitioner [NP]) nor geographic setting (urban vs rural) showed differences in use of recommended practices or general confident in pain management (all p > 0.05); however, physicians were slightly more confident in opioid dose conversion than NPs (6.9 vs 5.9; p < 0. 001, scale 0-9). Conclusions: Higher hours of recent CME positively benefit provider confidence in pain management and utilization of CDC recommended practices. NPs and rural providers were equivalent to their physician and urban counterparts on confidence and adherence to CDC practices, with minor exceptions.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)103-116
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Opioid Management
    Volume14
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

    Fingerprint

    Continuing Education
    Pain Management
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
    Chronic Pain
    Opioid Analgesics
    Guidelines
    Continuing Medical Education
    Physicians
    Recognition (Psychology)

    Keywords

    • Chronic pain 2016 CDC guideline opioid prescribing provider practice

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pharmacology (medical)
    • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

    Cite this

    Does familiarity with CDC guidelines, continuing education, and provider characteristics influence adherence to chronic pain management practices and opioid prescribing? / McCalmont, Jean C.; Jones, Kim; Bennett, Robert (Rob); Friend, Ronald.

    In: Journal of Opioid Management, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.03.2018, p. 103-116.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "Objectives: (1) To assess providers’ experience and knowledge of chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) management. (2) To assess providers’ utilization of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2016 Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. (3) To assess the influence of the 2016 CDC guideline on provider confidence in managing CNCP and adherence to the CDC recommendations. Methods: A cross-sectional, web-based survey conducted with 417 Oregon prescribing providers, divided into three continuing medical education (CME) groups composed of minimal (0-3), moderate (4-10), and high (≥11) hours of training. Results: The three CME groups were associated with increased use of CDC opioid recommended practices (29.4, 34.2, 38.8; p = 0.001; scale 0-50), opioid conversion confidence (5.5, 6.5, 7.4; p < 0.001; scale 0-9), and confidence in pain management (5.5, 5.9, 6.9; p < 0.001, scale 0-9). Slightly more providers utilized CDC recommended practices than did not (57 vs 43 percent). However, CME groups differed substantially in utilization of CDC practices (42 vs 57 vs 72 percent; p < 0.001). Neither providers’ profession (physician vs nurse practitioner [NP]) nor geographic setting (urban vs rural) showed differences in use of recommended practices or general confident in pain management (all p > 0.05); however, physicians were slightly more confident in opioid dose conversion than NPs (6.9 vs 5.9; p < 0. 001, scale 0-9). Conclusions: Higher hours of recent CME positively benefit provider confidence in pain management and utilization of CDC recommended practices. NPs and rural providers were equivalent to their physician and urban counterparts on confidence and adherence to CDC practices, with minor exceptions.",
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